Page 2 of 2 First 1 2
Results 11 to 13 of 13
  1. Piscean's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Europe
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 13,734
    #11

    Re: Implication in English

    Quote Originally Posted by cloa View Post
    "And would you like vegetables or salad?" the implied part is not the whole answer. It is only a part of the answer so the proper explicit possible answers are Yes, both. Yes, vegetables. Yes, salad. No, I don't want neither. No, I don't want neither. Can I have something else?

    If you wish to go (unnecessarily, in my opinion) into 'proper explicit possible answers', then perhaps they should be:

    No, I don't want vegetables or salad; I want both vegetables and salad.
    Yes, I would like vegetables/Yes, I would like salad.
    No, I want neither vegetables nor salad. I want nothing.
    No, I want neither vegetables nor salad. I want something else
    .

    This seems to be to be burdening the learners with a great deal of not particularly helpful material.

    There is enough garbage semantics in linguistics to last a lifetime so let's not include that.
    Which particular garbage semantics did you not want to include?

    I did a TEFL with so much jargon- most of which I will never use.
    I'd be interested to know what jargon you appear to dismiss. Perhaps you could tell us - in a new thread.

    None of my students are at a level whereby they write anything like that. My answer was implication in practice.

    whereby?
    Testing

  2. VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 6,564
    #12

    Re: Implication in English

    W: What steak would you like: rare, medium or well - done?
    A: Medium, please.
    W: And would you like vegetables or salad?
    A: Vegetables, please. (implies yes)

    Despite its syntactic form, the highlighted question does not require a yes/no answer. It is meant for the responder to say which of the two options he wants. The idea is that when you order the steak, there is a choice of accompaniment. You simply answer: Salad, please or Vegetables, please. It would be very unusual for someone not to order an accompaniment for a steak, and perhaps even more unlikely that someone would request both salad and vegetables!

    There is no implication of any kind being made here—just a direct answer to a clear question.
    Last edited by jutfrank; 28-Feb-2019 at 15:15.

  3. VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 6,564
    #13

    Re: Implication in English

    Quote Originally Posted by cloa View Post
    Short hand is implication- you are implying some words that are not included. There is enough garbage semantics in linguistics to last a lifetime so let's not include that.
    I have no idea what any of this is supposed to mean.

Page 2 of 2 First 1 2

Similar Threads

  1. [General] an implication
    By contiluo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Nov-2017, 05:02
  2. implication
    By Sepmre in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 21-Jan-2016, 12:08
  3. the implication of "only so much
    By optimistic pessimist in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-Nov-2011, 12:24
  4. [Grammar] implication
    By mamen in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Nov-2009, 04:11
  5. implication
    By blouen in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-Sep-2007, 06:32

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •