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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Question Underwater vs inwater

    Why is it called

    underwater
    under water
    under the water

    for something that is IN the water?

    Shouldn't it have been

    inwater
    in water
    in the water

    Under the air is the water
    Between the air and the water is the (water) surface
    Under the air is the water (well, some times)

    But under the water, is the seabed.

    So if you say something is "under water", it should be in the seabed (or under whatever is under the water, like the tiles and ground under a swimming pool)

    My next question would be [Deleted by moderator. Please post only one question per thread.]

    Thank you
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 09-Mar-2019 at 08:49. Reason: as shown

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Underwater vs inwater

    Welcome to the forum.

    "underwater" is defined as "beneath the surface of the water".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. VIP Member
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    #3

    Re: Underwater vs inwater

    In a similar way, 'underground' is 'beneath the surface of the ground'.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  4. Moderator
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    #4

    Re: Underwater vs inwater

    When there is water above you, you are under water. This is true whether or not there is water below you.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #5

    Re: Underwater vs inwater

    If you are in the water, your head could be above the water.

  6. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Underwater vs inwater

    One more thing. You need to say Shouldn't it be and not Shouldn't it have been.


  7. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Underwater vs inwater

    It doesn't have to make sense. It's English.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  8. probus's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Underwater vs inwater

    We use the single word underwater as an adjective to describle some things that occur or exist in water, for example underwater photography. Or we would say that scuba diving is an underwater activity. Otherwise the phrase "under water' is used. For example, it is very difficult to hear people when you are under water.

    And figuratively if you owe more on your car or house than it is worth you are under water, not underwater.

  9. Moderator
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    #9

    Re: Underwater vs inwater

    Note that 'inwater' does not exist in standard English.

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    #10

    Re: Underwater vs inwater

    jessichart, please read this extract from the forum's Posting Guidelines:

    You are welcome to answer questions posted in the Ask a Teacher forum as long as your suggestions, help, and advice reflect a good understanding of the English language.

    If you are not a teacher, you will need to state that clearly in your post.

    Please note, all posts are moderated by our in-house language experts, so make sure your suggestions, help, and advice provide the kind of information an international language teacher would offer. If not, and your posts do not contribute to the topic in a positive way, they will be subject to deletion.

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