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  1. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Do you think they are right about the pronunciation of 'c'?
    Yes, of course they are right. They didn't just make it up. I think an important point that hasn't been mentioned is that the rule originally applied only to Latinate, not Germanic or other, words. That means words derived from the Latin language.

    finger

    The 'g' is not pronounced like a 'j' because it's not a Latinate word.

    So if you can tell whether a word is derived from Latin, then the rule is quite useful. If you can't, it's not.

  2. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    The only exceptions I can think of for C are Celt and Celtic
    Those words are derived from ancient Greek, where the first consonant was a /k/ sound.

    It is typical of Greek-derived words that we still pronounce them with a /k/. The first word I thought of was encephalitis.

    (Note: I've just learned that American English favours encephalitis pronounced with a /s/. This generalisation shows how powerful the rule can be.)

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    #13

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    It is typical of Greek-derived words that we still pronounce them with a /k/. The first word I thought of was encephalitis.

    (Note: I've just learned that American English favours encephalitis pronounced with a /s/. This generalisation shows how powerful the rule can be.)
    I never knew that Brits pronounced that word differently. I don't think I've ever heard it with a /k/ pronunciation.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #14

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    It is typical of Greek-derived words that we still pronounce them with a /k/. The first word I thought of was encephalitis.
    The Longman Pronunciation Dictionary (3rd edn) gives only`/s/ for the AmE version. It gives both /k/ and /s/ for the BrE version, with /k/ as the more common.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  5. Skrej's Avatar
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    #15

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    I never knew that Brits pronounced that word differently. I don't think I've ever heard it with a /k/ pronunciation.
    It's not just the Brits. I've always pronounced it as 'Kelt'.

    I'm not much on sports, so I was surprised when somebody mocked me for referring to the "Boston Keltics".
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  6. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #16

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    It's not just the Brits. I've always pronounced it as 'Kelt'.

    I'm not much on sports, so I was surprised when somebody mocked me for referring to the "Boston Keltics".
    I think GoesStation was talking about encephalitis there.

    The Glasgow football team Celtic is also pronounced with a /s/.

    But when talking about the culture, I think everyone would use a /k/, even American speakers.

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    #17

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    I think GoesStation was talking about encephalitis there.

    The Glasgow football team Celtic is also pronounced with a /sAnatomy makes the splits much more difficult for boys.

    But when talking about the culture, I think everyone would use a /k/, even American speakers.
    I'm pretty confident that most Americans are entirely unaware of the existence of a Celtic culture and would blithely pronounce the word with an /s/ regardless of context. I'd love to be proven wrong though.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #18

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    I'm pretty confident that most Americans are entirely unaware of the existence of a Celtic culture and would blithely pronounce the word with an /s/ regardless of context. I'd love to be proven wrong though.
    Regrettable, perhaps, but true. The 1% or so who watch public television would probably know the "k" pronunciation because of Celtic music programs, but few others would.
    Last edited by probus; 20-Mar-2019 at 04:56.

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    #19

    Re: G -pronunciation

    I distinctly remember the word "Celtic" (referring to the cultures, languages, etc.) being pronounced with an "s" sound both in the UK and the US in the 1970s. Then more and more people started pronouncing it with a "k" in the 1980s, stressing that it was the "proper" and more enlightened pronunciation.
    NOT A TEACHER. Translator and editor, and I hold a TESOL certificate. Native speaker of American English (West Coast)

  10. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #20

    Re: G -pronunciation

    I have always pronounced "encephalitis" with an "s" sound as the third letter. I think I've occasionally heard medical professionals pronounce it with a "k" sound but everyone I know pronounces it like I do. (BrE)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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