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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    G -pronunciation

    Hello

    Is 'g' always pronounced as ˈdʒ' as in ˈdʒendə(r) before e, i, y?

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    #2

    Re: G -pronunciation

    No.

    get, begin, gynaecology all have a /g/ sound.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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    #3

    Re: G -pronunciation

    English spelling has few unbreakable rules. You might want to look up the pronunciation of these words:
    • singing
    • sagginess
    • saggy
    • mugged
    • mugging
    • muggy
    • winged
    • bunged

    There are many more. You can see some helpful patterns in these words: a double g is nearly always /g/; the suffixes -ing and -ed don't soften the g.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 10-Mar-2019 at 20:31.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: G -pronunciation

    I came across this article about English consonants. It is written in Russian but they give examples in English. It also shows how a 'c' is usually pronounced before a, o, u, as /k/ and as /s/ before e, y, i. https://www.englishdom.com/blog/prav...ijskom-yazyke/
    C [k] предшествует любой согласной,
    гласным a / o / u,
    конечная позиция
    coal
    [kəul]
    C [s] предшествует гласным
    e / i / y/td>
    cyanide
    ['saɪənaɪd]

  5. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: G -pronunciation

    It can also have an f sound, as in rough, laugh, cough, and enough.

    And it can be silent, as in though.

    In the US, at least, some words that we imported from France give g the zh sound, like garage, mirage, and triage.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #6

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    • singing
    • winged
    • bunged

    the suffixes -ing and -ed don't soften the g.
    THere is no 'g' sound, /g/ or /dʒ/, in those words in most varieties/dialects of English. The sound of 'ng' is /ŋ/
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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    #7

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    THere is no 'g' sound, /g/ or /dʒ/, in those words in most varieties/dialects of English. The sound of 'ng' is /ŋ/
    Good point I'd still call it one type of g sound - and one I hadn't thought of!

    So, Rachel, you're getting a lot of g possibilities here. Good question!
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #8

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Last night I spotted another example: hoagie (also Hoagie when it's a name).
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    #9

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Do you think they are right about the pronunciation of 'c'?

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