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Thread: more stiff

  1. Member
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    #1

    more stiff

    Hello,

    Could anyone help me identify if the speaker is saying "more stiff" in this MP3 file?

    Here's a snippet from my dictation.

    Indirect. And as that arm floats, so you may notice a sense of solidity as it floats in the place of space in fact you can feel that now that sense. You might wonder whether the wrist is the more stiff than the elbow, or the elbow is more stiff than the shoulder.


    If my hearing is correct that the speaker is saying, "more stiff". My question is I think the comparative degree for "stiff" is "stiffer" as some online dictionaries indictate this too, but why does he say "more stiff"?

    The speaker is a British hypnotist, and this file is a relevant about the seminar.

    Thank you in advance!

    PS. My listening to English is not good, so I have to post here to get confirmed if I hear this correct.
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  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: more stiff

    Yes, he says "more stiff" both times. However, he doesn't say "the" before the first "more".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: more stiff

    Is that a British thing?

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    #4

    Re: more stiff

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Yes, he says "more stiff" both times. However, he doesn't say "the" before the first "more".
    Thank you for your confirmation. But why does he say "more stiff" instead of "stiffer"?

    Some dictionaries indicate that the comparative degree is "stiffer". Is it colloquial for using "more stiff"?

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: more stiff

    You'd have to ask the speaker why he chose "more stiff" over "stiffer". I'd have used the latter but the former is entirely understandable and isn't necessarily wrong.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: more stiff

    Quote Originally Posted by tree123 View Post
    Thank you for your confirmation. But why does he say "more stiff" instead of "stiffer"?

    Some dictionaries indicate that the comparative degree is "stiffer". Is it colloquial for using "more stiff"?
    It's not colloquial. If anything, "more stiff" sounds a little more formal to me. Many comparatives can be replaced with more​ + the plain adjective.
    I am not a teacher.

  7. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #7

    Re: more stiff

    The traditional view that we make comparatives of one-syllable adjectives only with -er is being challenged. I would say stiffer, but I am probably old enough to be the speaker's father.

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    #8

    Re: more stiff

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    The traditional view that we make comparatives of one-syllable adjectives only with -er is being challenged. I would say stiffer, but I am probably old enough to be the speaker's father.
    This is what I learnt in our English textbooks and grammar book. I guess he is in his mid or early 50s.

  9. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #9

    Re: more stiff

    Things are changing.

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    #10

    Re: more stiff

    I have some experience in hypnosis.

    I can tell you that when performing a hypnotic induction, hyponotists choose their words very carefully. There are good reasons for using the exact phrase more stiff twice in quick succession.

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