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  1. Disckstuckinfan's Avatar
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    #1

    Two idioms I heard the other day

    Wassup bros,

    My name is Antonio, I hail from Cádiz but currently studying English in the magnificent USA. In my mind, English is the best and more influential language on Earth. Peeps from all over the world can communicate through English. There is no other language that matches its domination. This is why I want to learn as much as I can with special care on vocabulary and idioms. I would say grammar but many locals that I have met commit errors while speaking, and some of them are quite basic imo. Anyway, my question is about two idioms (I have bolded them) that I heard the other day. Please revise my sentences and tell me if I have utilized them appropriately. Here are the sentences I invented:

    1. Last night I was talking to my sister about the way his boyfriend has been treating her. I knew/could tell there was something wrong by the tone of her voice. Throughout the conversation, I asked her on several occasions what was wrong but she kept beating around the bush, it was like she was hiding something from me.

    2. When I received the invitation to Michelle's dinner, I felt ecstatic. She was the girl I have always been in love with. This was my opportunity and I had to seize it eagerly. Regrettably, due to ironies of life, I couldn't attend the social gathering and I missed out my chance.

    Btw, can I respond to other people's post here?

    Yours,

    Antonio
    Last edited by Disckstuckinfan; 19-Mar-2019 at 00:48. Reason: Fixing typos

  2. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Two idioms I heard the other day

    1. That's not a good example of beat around the bush. In this situation, it seems as if your sister was being evasive. We use beat around the bush when somebody is being hesitant to do a task that they need to do. We usually say something like "Come on. Stop beating around the bush and get on with it."

    2. What's the idiom here?


    Next time, put the idiom that you ask about as the title of the thread. Try to stick to only one idiom per thread.

  3. Disckstuckinfan's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Two idioms I heard the other day

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    1. That's not a good example of beat around the bush. In this situation, it seems as if your sister was being evasive. We use beat around the bush when somebody is being hesitant to do a task that they need to do. We usually say something like "Come on. Stop beating around the bush and get on with it."

    2. What's the idiom here?


    Next time, put the idiom that you ask about as the title of the thread. Try to stick to only one idiom per thread.
    Dear jutfrank, thank you for your comments. I was convinced seize an opportunity is an idiom. Ok I Will ask one question per thread in my future posts.

  4. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Two idioms I heard the other day

    Quote Originally Posted by Disckstuckinfan View Post
    Hello!

    My name is Antonio. I hail from Cádiz but am currently studying English in the magnificent USA. In my mind, English is the best and more influential language on earth. Peeps from all over the world can communicate through English. There is no other language that matches its domination. This is why I want to learn as much as I can, with special care on vocabulary and idioms. I would say grammar, but many locals who I have met commit errors while speaking, and some of them are quite basic, in my opinion. Anyway, my question is about two idioms (I have bolded them) that I heard the other day. Please revise my sentences and tell me if I have used them appropriately. Here are the sentences I invented:

    1. Last night I was talking to my sister about the way her boyfriend has been treating her. I knew/could tell there was something wrong by the tone of her voice. Throughout the conversation, I asked her on several occasions what was wrong, but she kept beating around the bush. It was like she was hiding something from me.

    2. When I received the invitation to Michelle's dinner, I was ecstatic. She was the girl I had always been in love with.

    (In this situation use either she is the girl you have been in love with or was the girl you had been in love with, depending on whether you're still in love with her.)

    This was my opportunity, and I had to seize it eagerly.

    (That's fine. It would mean the same thing in fewer words to say either "I had to seize it" or "I seized it eagerly.")


    Regrettably, due to the ironies of life, I couldn't attend the social gathering, and I missed out my chance.

    By the way, may I respond to other people's posts here?

    Yours,

    Antonio
    Hi, Antonio. Welcome!

    Your use of those two expressions seem fine to me. Words like wassup and peeps are perfectly good slang, but this isn't a perfectly good place to use a lot of slang. You won't be taken as seriously as you probably want to be. Likewise, it's better not to use text-speak here. And remember that both men and women answer questions here.

    Yes, it's fine for you to comment, as long as you always make clear that you're not a teacher and English isn't your native language.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #5

    Re: Two idioms I heard the other day

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    1. That's not a good example of beat around the bush. In this situation, it seems as if your sister was being evasive. We use beat around the bush when somebody is being hesitant to do a task that they need to do.
    I don't agree. I go with these definitions:

    ​to avoid talking about what is important:
    Don't beat around the bush - get to the point!

    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dic...round-the-bush

    to avoid or delay talking about something embarrassing or unpleasant
    Don’t beat around the bush. Ask for your account to be paid, and paid quickly.

    https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/beat-about-around-the-bush
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  6. Disckstuckinfan's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Two idioms I heard the other day

    Dear Charlie, thank you very much for correcting my errors and my sentences. I really appreciate that. Thank you, Piscean too.
    Whoops. I wasn't aware there are female administrators in here. I hope I haven't alienated them with my bros expression. I apologize.

  7. Disckstuckinfan's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Two idioms I heard the other day

    Yes, it's fine for you to comment, as long as you always make clear that you're not a teacher and English isn't your native language.

    So, can I say any of these two sentences?
    I am not a native English speaker nor (am I) a teacher.
    I am neither a native English nor a teacher.

  8. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Two idioms I heard the other day

    Quote Originally Posted by Disckstuckinfan View Post
    Yes, it's fine for you to comment, as long as you always make clear that you're not a teacher and English isn't your native language.

    So, can I say any of these two sentences?
    I am not a native English speaker nor (am I) a teacher.
    I am neither a native English nor a teacher.
    They're fine. Remember to keep it simple for students who are just beginning.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  9. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Two idioms I heard the other day

    Quote Originally Posted by Disckstuckinfan View Post
    Dear Charlie, thank you very much for correcting my errors and my sentences. I really appreciate that. Thank you, Piscean too.
    Whoops. I wasn't aware there are female administrators in here. I hope I haven't alienated them with my bros expression. I apologize.
    No problem! It might be more of an issue in English than in languages where everything is a he or a she.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  10. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Two idioms I heard the other day

    I don't feel alienated, I can assure you. I would, of course, have changed "Whassup bros" to "Hello everyone". I actually have more of an issue with "Whassup" than "bros". I realise that it's the written version of the badly-pronounced '"What's up?" but I really dislike it!

    Off topic - actually, when I saw "bros", I immediately thought of the 80s pop duo "Bros"!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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