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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    you are listening to Ray Charles, reading Leo Tolstoy

    Listening to, say, Ray Charles's music and singing, would it be correct to say that you are listening to Ray Charles? What about reading Leo Tolstoy? Do you express such ideas this way?
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

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    #2

    Re: you are listening to Ray Charles, reading Leo Tolstoy

    Yes.

    Note that you are listening to Ray Charles, reading Leo Tolstoy means Ray Charles is reading Tolstoy aloud and you're listening to him.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: you are listening to Ray Charles, reading Leo Tolstoy

    If you mean the title, I didn't mean it to be a sentence. BTW, if I had realised that it could be read in the sense you pointed out, I would have probably left it as it was (in the title, I mean); it's just more interesting.
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: you are listening to Ray Charles, reading Leo Tolstoy

    The comma makes a difference as to who is reading Tolstoy.

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    #5

    Re: you are listening to Ray Charles, reading Leo Tolstoy

    Could you explain the difference, please? I'm not sure I understand your point.
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: you are listening to Ray Charles, reading Leo Tolstoy

    1. You are
    [listening to Ray Charles], [reading Leo Tolstoy].


    You are listening to Ray Charles while you are reading Tolstoy.
    While reading Tolstoy, you are listening to Ray Charles.

    2. You are listening to Ray Charles, singing a song. = You are listening to Ray Charles and singing a song.

    3. You are listening to [Ray Charles reading Leo Tolstoy].

    You are listening to Ray Charles while he is reading Tolstoy.

    4. You are listening to Ray Charles singing a song. = You are listening to Ray Charles as he is singing a song. = You are listening to Ray Charles singing.
    Last edited by Raymott; 30-Mar-2019 at 09:34.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: you are listening to Ray Charles, reading Leo Tolstoy

    If you were simply giving us two versions of the same construction in your title, you could have written it like these:

    You are listening to Ray Charles/You are reading Leo Tolstoy
    You are listening to Ray Charles/reading Leo Tolstoy
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: you are listening to Ray Charles, reading Leo Tolstoy

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Yes.

    Note that you are listening to Ray Charles, reading Leo Tolstoy means Ray Charles is reading Tolstoy aloud and you're listening to him.
    I'd read it that way if we got rid of the comma.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  9. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: you are listening to Ray Charles, reading Leo Tolstoy

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneD View Post
    Listening to, say, Ray Charles's music and singing, would it be correct to say that you are listening to Ray Charles?

    Yes.

    What about reading Leo Tolstoy? Do you express such ideas this way?

    Yes.
    They're slightly idiomatic, aren't they? You have them exactly right: I'm listening to Ray Charles. I'm reading Leo Tolsoy.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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