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    #1

    G -pronunciation

    Hello

    Is 'g' always pronounced as ˈdʒ' as in ˈdʒendə(r) before e, i, y?

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    #2

    Re: G -pronunciation

    No.

    get, begin, gynaecology all have a /g/ sound.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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    #3

    Re: G -pronunciation

    English spelling has few unbreakable rules. You might want to look up the pronunciation of these words:
    • singing
    • sagginess
    • saggy
    • mugged
    • mugging
    • muggy
    • winged
    • bunged

    There are many more. You can see some helpful patterns in these words: a double g is nearly always /g/; the suffixes -ing and -ed don't soften the g.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 10-Mar-2019 at 20:31.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: G -pronunciation

    I came across this article about English consonants. It is written in Russian but they give examples in English. It also shows how a 'c' is usually pronounced before a, o, u, as /k/ and as /s/ before e, y, i. https://www.englishdom.com/blog/prav...ijskom-yazyke/
    C [k] предшествует любой согласной,
    гласным a / o / u,
    конечная позиция
    coal
    [kəul]
    C [s] предшествует гласным
    e / i / y/td>
    cyanide
    ['saɪənaɪd]

  5. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: G -pronunciation

    It can also have an f sound, as in rough, laugh, cough, and enough.

    And it can be silent, as in though.

    In the US, at least, some words that we imported from France give g the zh sound, like garage, mirage, and triage.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #6

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    • singing
    • winged
    • bunged

    the suffixes -ing and -ed don't soften the g.
    THere is no 'g' sound, /g/ or /dʒ/, in those words in most varieties/dialects of English. The sound of 'ng' is /ŋ/
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  7. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    THere is no 'g' sound, /g/ or /dʒ/, in those words in most varieties/dialects of English. The sound of 'ng' is /ŋ/
    Good point I'd still call it one type of g sound - and one I hadn't thought of!

    So, Rachel, you're getting a lot of g possibilities here. Good question!
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #8

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Last night I spotted another example: hoagie (also Hoagie when it's a name).
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    #9

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Do you think they are right about the pronunciation of 'c'?

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    #10

    Re: G -pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    I came across this article about English consonants. It is written in Russian but they give examples in English. It also shows how a 'c' is usually pronounced before a, o, u, as /k/ and as /s/ before e, y, i. https://www.englishdom.com/blog/prav...ijskom-yazyke/
    C [k] предшествует любой согласной,
    гласным a / o / u,
    конечная позиция
    coal
    [kəul]
    C [s] предшествует гласным
    e / i / y/td>
    cyanide
    ['saɪənaɪd]
    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Do you think they are right about the pronunciation of 'c'?
    Yes. The same tendency applies to the letter G, but as you've seen, there are lots of exceptions. The only exceptions I can think of for C are Celt and Celtic,​ though the latter is pronounced like "sell-tic" when referring to the basketball team from Boston.
    I am not a teacher.

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