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Thread: dialects

  1. Banned
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    #11

    Re: dialects

    Although there are countless English dialects, I have always thought that the official variations of English are British and American.

  2. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    You need to remember that people in the part of the UK referred to as England don't routinely refer to themselves as English. Most of us say we're British or that we're from the UK. Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish people do tend to be a little more specific.
    I'm not sure I understand what you mean here. Of course people from England refer to themselves as English, as people from Scotland refer to themselves as Scottish and people from Wales as Welsh. All of these groups refer to their wider identity as British, since a) these territories are part of the greater territory that we call Britain, and b) British is the word we happen to use for our nationality as UK citizens. Northern Ireland is an interesting case in that its people, being citizens of the UK, are technically British by nationality, even though they live in Ireland, not Britain.

    Nationality is only one way of the many different and important ways in which people identify themselves.
    Last edited by jutfrank; 13-May-2019 at 16:56.

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    #13

    Re: dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by Disckstuckinfan View Post
    There is no such thing as Indian English.
    That seems a strange thing to say!

    Quote Originally Posted by Disckstuckinfan View Post
    Although there are countless English dialects, I have always thought that the official variations of English are British and American.
    I wonder what on earth you might possibly mean by "official variations". In what sense did you think other varieties were unofficial?

    The terms 'dialect' and 'variety' do not mean the same thing.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #14

    Re: dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    I'm not sure I understand what you mean here. Of course people from England refer to themselves as English, as people from Scotland refer to themselves as Scottish and people from Wales as Welsh. All of these groups refer to their wider identity as British, since a) these territories are part of the greater territory that we call Britain, and b) British is the word we use for our nationality as UK citizens. Northern Ireland is an interesting case in that its people, being part of the UK, are technically British by nationality, even though they live in Ireland, not Britain.

    Nationality is only one way of the many different and important ways in which people identify themselves.
    I'm struggling to quite explain what I mean, in all honesty! I think it might have something to do with Scottish, Welsh and Irish people seemingly being a little more proud of their heritage. If you ask someone from London where they're from, they're likely to say either "London" or "The UK" (or maybe "I'm British"). If you ask the same question of someone from Glasgow, they're likely to say either "Glasgow", "Scotland" or "I'm Scottish" (the same idea goes for someone from Cardiff or Belfast). I'm only going by my own experience. Of course, their actual nationality is British (I am very aware that "nationality" is used very differently in AmE).

    And yes, people from Northern Ireland live on the island of Ireland but they don't live in Ireland (if you use Ireland to mean the country).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #15

    Re: dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by Disckstuckinfan View Post
    There is no such thing as Indian English.
    Yes, there is.

  6. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #16

    Re: dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by Disckstuckinfan View Post
    Although there are countless English dialects, I have always thought that the official variations of English are British and American.
    There is no such things as official English- a number of English-speaking countries don't even have English as an/the official language. Australian, South African, Jamaican, Singaporean, Indian, etc, etc, Englishes are all English.

  7. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #17

    Re: dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by Do228 View Post
    I as a speaker of standard German feel so annoyed when I hear Austrians, Saxons, Bavarians, etc. talk because it feels to me like they're raping the language.
    I am closing the thread because of this. We are more likely to get angry when we hear our fellow speakers described as language rapists. This seems more nationalism than linguistics to me.

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    #18

    Re: dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by Disckstuckinfan View Post
    There is no such thing as Indian English.
    You are dead wrong about that, and you can take it from me: a native speaker of English and a citizen of India.
    Last edited by probus; 13-May-2019 at 17:46. Reason: Typo

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