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Thread: dialects

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    #1

    dialects

    Do many Englishmen get angry when they hear people talk with heavy dialects, e.g. Indian English or Scottish English?
    I as a speaker of standard German feel so annoyed when I hear Austrians, Saxons, Bavarians, etc. talk because it feels to me like they're raping the language.

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    #2

    Re: dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by Do228 View Post
    Do many Englishmen get angry when they hear people talk with heavy dialects, e.g. Indian English or Scottish English?
    I, as a speaker of standard German, feel so annoyed when I hear Austrians, Saxons, Bavarians, etc. talk because it feels to me like they're raping the language.
    1. I'm sure we've told you before that "Englishmen" is probably not the word you want. It's better than "Englanders" (I can't remember if it was you who previously used that) but it really doesn't mean much. Do you mean "native speakers of English who come from the area referred to as England"? And what about all the women from England?

    2. What makes you think that Indian English and Scottish English are necessarily "heavy dialects"? And do you mean "dialect" or "accent"?

    3. What exactly is "standard German"?

    4. I really think that comparing language use to rape is unnecessary and verging on offensive.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by Do228 View Post
    Do many Englishmen get angry when they hear people talk with heavy dialects, e.g. Indian English or Scottish English?
    I as a speaker of standard German feel so annoyed when I hear Austrians, Saxons, Bavarians, etc. talk because it feels to me like they're raping the language.
    So which Standard German do you speak, Austrian Standard German, German Standard German or Swiss Standard German?

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    #4

    Re: dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by Do228 View Post
    Do many Englishmen get angry when they hear people talk with heavy dialects, e.g. Indian English or Scottish English?
    No.
    I as a speaker of standard German feel so annoyed when I hear Austrians, Saxons, Bavarians, etc. talk because it feels to me like they're raping the language.
    That's unfortunate.

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    #5

    Re: dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    1. I'm sure we've told you before that "Englishmen" is probably not the word you want. It's better than "Englanders" (I can't remember if it was you who previously used that) but it really doesn't mean much. Do you mean "native speakers of English who come from the area referred to as England"? And what about all the women from England?

    2. What makes you think that Indian English and Scottish English are necessarily "heavy dialects"? And do you mean "dialect" or "accent"?

    3. What exactly is "standard German"?

    4. I really think that comparing language use to rape is unnecessary and verging on offensive.
    I used "Englishmen" for 2 reasons. A) My favorite term "Englanders" is not really accepted on this forum and B) "Englishmen and English women and English transgenders and English kids etc." would be too wordy, wouldn't it?
    Frankly, I wish you would encourage your pupils to use "Englanders" more often so that it maybe becomes a common term someday. I mean it's a short, catchy term which includes males, females, everybody, don't you think so?

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    #6

    Re: dialects

    How do you feel when some native English-speakers address all German people as Krauts?

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    #7

    Re: dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by Do228 View Post
    I used "Englishmen" for 2 two reasons.
    A) My favorite term "Englanders" is not really accepted on this forum and B) "Englishmen and English women and English transgenders and English kids etc." would be too wordy, wouldn't it?
    Yes, it would be too wordy. Did you consider "English people"? That's the collective term.

    Frankly, I wish you would encourage your pupils to use "Englanders" more often so that it maybe becomes a common term someday. We're not going to do that.

    I mean it's a short, catchy term which includes males, females, everybody, don't you think? so? It's one syllable shorter than "English people" and it's not catchy. You have to remember that it already has negative connotations, as you've been told before.
    Please see my comments above.

    You need to remember that people in the part of the UK referred to as England don't routinely refer to themselves as English. Most of us say we're British or that we're from the UK. Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish people do tend to be a little more specific.

    The dictionary definition of "Englander" is "a native of England", meaning only "someone who was born in England". In this multicultural society, being born in England does not dictate your accent. It tells the listener/reader absolutely nothing about someone's nationality or ethnicity and, therefore, nothing about their accent.

    In your first post, you used the word "dialect". That's not the same as "accent". If someone from Scotland started speaking to me in their specific dialect, there's a good chance I would struggle to understand them but that's down to a combination of accent and vocabulary. According to your post, because I speak with an accent from the south-east of England, I should be annoyed by this Scottish person. Of course I wouldn't! My first reaction would be fascination and then I would have to ask the person if they could, effectively, translate what they'd said for me.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 13-May-2019 at 10:18.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: dialects

    Quote Originally Posted by Do228 View Post
    I used "Englishmen" for 2 reasons. A) My favorite term "Englanders" is not really accepted on this forum
    It's not accepted by English people anywhere.

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    #9

    Re: dialects

    There is no such thing as Indian English.

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    #10

    Re: dialects

    Indian English is a term used of the varieties of English spoken within India. Many of these varieties share features of pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary that mark them as a clearly different variety from, for example, varieties and dialects of British and American English.

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