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Thread: Doing

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    #1

    Doing

    A Chinese guy in a YouTube video says Americans actually pronounce "doing" as "do wing".

    Many Chinese including me pronounce it as "do ing".

    - Do Americans really pronounce in this way?

    - Do English people say "do ing" or "do win(g)"?


    My listening is not good. I think he probably is correct about this, but I'm not quite sure.
    Last edited by tree123; 19-May-2019 at 12:40.
    Please correct my writing if there's any grammatical solecism.

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    #2

    Re: Doing

    A slight /w/ intrudes into the glide from the /uː/ to the /ɪ/ of ˈ/duːɪŋ/ in BrE.This is not considered to be a separate sound - most native speakers don't even realise they produce it.

    Similarly, there is a slight intrusive /j/ in for example the glide between the vowels of I am.
    Last edited by Piscean; 19-May-2019 at 12:45.

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    #3

    Re: Doing

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    A slight /w/ intrudes into the glide from the /uː/ to the /ɪ/ of ˈ/duːɪŋ/ in BrE.This is not considered to be a separate sound - most native speakers don't even realise they produce it.
    This is one of problems of our listening. Many Chinese don't understand some very simple words though we learnt how to spell each word. There's a comment beneath that video from another Chinese viewer. She says she has been living in the USA for around 10 years, and many people think she is a native speaker of English, however she can't understand some sentences Americans say either.

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post

    Similarly, there is a slight intrusive j/ in for example the glide between the vowels of I am.
    Do you mean that is pronounced as [ai jam]?
    Last edited by tree123; 19-May-2019 at 14:12.
    Please correct my writing if there's any grammatical solecism.

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    #4

    Re: Doing

    Quote Originally Posted by tree123 View Post
    Do you mean that is pronounced as [ai jam]?
    I don't do phonetics but "I am" sounds like "I yam".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: Doing

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I don't do phonetics but "I am" sounds like "I yam".
    Does this mean native speakers would add a certain consonant between two words if the first word ends with a vowel, and the second word starts with a vowel, except for "I am"?
    Last edited by tree123; 19-May-2019 at 09:30.
    Please correct my writing if there's any grammatical solecism.

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    #6

    Re: Doing

    Quote Originally Posted by tree123 View Post
    Do this mean native speakers would add a certain consonant between two words if the first word ends with a vowel, and the second word starts with a vowel, except for "I am"?
    When one word ends with a vowel and the next begins with a vowel, the glide between them frequently involves a /j/ or /w/. "I am" is not an exception. We do not add a consonant.

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    #7

    Re: Doing

    That "y" sound generally appears between "I" and any word starting with "a".

    I always do that sounds like I yalways do that.
    I ambled along the road sounds like I yambled along the road.

    It doesn't appear between just any vowel and another vowel.

    The llama always does that doesn't have the "y" sound. Nor does The llama ambled along the road.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: Doing

    Quote Originally Posted by tree123 View Post
    T

    Do you mean that is pronounced as [ai jam]?

    The junctural glide (the linking /j/) is not normally transcribed phonemically - /æm]. It is transcribed phonetically

    with a superscript symbol -[aɪ
    jæm] (rather smaller than I can get it in this post).

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    #9

    Re: Doing

    As ems said, these sounds don't appear between just any vowel and another vowel. Sorry if I seemed to suggest that.

    The junctural glide /j/ can appear between /iː, ɪ, eɪ, aɪ, ɔɪ/ and a following vowel.
    The junctural glide /w/ cabn appear between /uː, ʊ, əʊ, aʊ/ and a following vowel.

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    #10

    Re: Doing

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The llama always does that doesn't have the "y" sound. Nor does The llama ambled along the road.
    The intruding sound there is a /r/ sound (the other one along with /j/ and /w/), which makes your second example sound like The llama rambled ...

    An example I like is Law & Order, which when I say it sounds like Laura Norder.

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