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Thread: boor

  1. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: boor

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneD View Post
    When you mentioned that there is some other word hidden and it has the real meaning of "berk", I instantly got intrigued and googled for the original. I think I may become a fan of Cockney slang
    You probably ain't got a scooby what I'm rabbitting about 'ere, so use yer loaf—get off yer April, get on the sportsman's sharpish, an' 'ave a good butcher's.
    Last edited by jutfrank; 07-Jun-2019 at 21:21.

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    #12

    Re: boor

    It's like an entirely different language! My loaf nearly exploded reading that, so I had to have a butcher's on the sportsman's to get a scooby to see what you rabbited about.

    I'm definitely becoming some kind of fan of Cockney slang. I wonder, though, how many people (in England, at least) understand the slang. I suspect there are some must-know words that every Englishman or Englishwoman has to know. Am I mistaken?
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

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    #13

    Re: boor

    In England, I suppose pretty much everyone understands the use of the most common ones, even if they can't explain the derivations. Outside of England but still in the UK, I guess the number is quite a bit lower. Outside of the UK, I would imagine that most people know virtually nothing.
    Last edited by jutfrank; 07-Jun-2019 at 22:28.

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    #14

    Re: boor

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    In England, I suppose pretty much everyone understands the use of the most common ones, even if they can't explain the derivations. Outside of England but still in the UK, I guess the number is quite a bit lower. Outside of the UK, I would imagine that most people know virtually nothing.
    Of the examples you've given I would say that "rabbiting on" (usually in that form) is quite common in Aust/NZ, while "butcher's" and "loaf" are occasionally heard.
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    #15

    Re: boor

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneD View Post
    I wonder, though, how many people (in England, at least) understand the slang.
    The first time this American heard Cockney slang was in late December, 1975. While driving from Los Angeles to Toronto, I picked up a hitchhiker. He started chatting in an accent I couldn't identify, and frequently threw in mysterious vocabulary that he emphasized in a way that made me think he was making a joke.

    Eventually he asked me if I could guess where he was from. I said "Germany?" He laughed and said "No, Wales!" I can't imagine now how I could have heard a Welsh accent as German, but I did. He explained Cockney rhyming slang to me, too.
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    #16

    Re: boor

    Great joke about language.

    A Welshman goes into a Chinese restaurant in Wales and is amazed to find that the menu is in Welsh and the Chinese waiter speaks Welsh. The owner comes by and the man stops him and says "How on earth did you find a waiter who speaks Welsh?" The owner replies "Ssshhh! He thinks he's learning English."
    Last edited by probus; 08-Jun-2019 at 21:28.

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    #17

    Re: boor

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    The owner replies "Ssshhh! He thinks he's learning English."
    That reminds me of a true story. My aunt’s father, a Mr. Czarny, immigrated to the United States from Poland and settled in a German-speaking area. "Czarny" means "black" and, wanting to Americanize his name, he asked someone what the American word for black was.

    That's how my aunt grew up as Miss Schwartz.
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    #18

    Re: boor

    We used to tell this one in elementary school:
    A guy is walking down the street when he sees a sign, "John Johnson's Chinese Laundry". He's curious, so he goes in and an Asian man asks if he can help him. "Are you the owner?" "Yes I am!" "You're John Johnson?" "Yup!" "Well, if you don't mind me asking, how did you get that name?" "It was like this: when I was standing in line at Immigration, the guy two places in front of me stepped up, they asked his name, and he said, 'Ja, my name is John Johnson!', and then the guy in front of me stepped up, they asked him, and he said, 'My name is John Johnson!'". "So then it was my turn. They asked me what my name is and I said, Sam Ting..."

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    #19

    Re: boor

    Wow, J&K your schoolboy tale has a solid basis in American immigration law.

    About 30 years ago my brother was forced by his Fortune500 employer to move from Canada to the United States. Needless to say they got him a green card, and after living in the US for several years he decided to stay permanently and take up US citizenship. The process concluded with an interview at the end of which the immigration officer asked "What do you want to be known as?" to which my brother replied "What?"
    This question and answer were repeated several times until my brother eventually understood he was being offered the chance to choose an entirely new name for his life as an American. Having had no time to think about it, and having a bunch of expensive degrees, he decided to stick with his birth name. Now he says he regrets it and wishes he had chosen "James Dean ."
    Last edited by probus; 23-Jun-2019 at 09:57.

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    #20

    Re: boor

    J&K, did he say "Sam Ting John Johnson"?
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

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