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Thread: boor

  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    boor

    What do you call people who behave in a rude way, say nasty things to others, etc? The dictionary I checked suggested "boor", but the word was marked as "old-fashioned". Is it still used? What other words would you use?
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

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    #2

    Re: boor

    Try "ruffian" or "yob".

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    #3

    Re: boor

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneD View Post
    What do you call people who behave in a rude way, say nasty things to others, etc? The dictionary I checked suggested "boor", but the word was marked as "old-fashioned". Is it still used? What other words would you use?
    "Boor" may have fallen out of fashion, and it certainly isn't used by people with small vocabularies, but the adjective "boorish" is still in use, especially in the phrase "boorish behaviour".
    I am not a teacher

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    #4

    Re: boor

    You might take a look at the word 'jerk'. Beyond that you're pretty quickly into profanities.

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    #5

    Re: boor

    A boor is just ill-mannered. Jerk is a much broader term covering people whose possible rudeness is far from their biggest failing. Urban dictionary is good on jerk.

    I think jerk is exclusively American. Long ago when I lived in England their equivalent was berk. Maybe nowadays it's prat?
    Last edited by probus; 07-Jun-2019 at 04:23.

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    #6

    Re: boor

    Some people in my circle of family and friends still use "berk" and "prat". It should be noted that "berk" is a shortened form of Cockney rhyming slang for an extremely rude word (the one word that many people in the UK will not say and get very upset when they hear). I wouldn't say, though, that either of them describes someone who is rude and nasty to others, as stated in post #1. I'm afraid if they were that unpleasant, I'd probably be heading for something like "bastard" or "bitch".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: boor

    Do I understand correctly that "berk" sounds like a euphemism for the one rhyming with "hunt"? It's not that rude, is it?
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

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    #8

    Re: boor

    When you mentioned that there is some other word hidden and it has the real meaning of "berk", I instantly got intrigued and googled for the original. I think I may become a fan of Cockney slang with your help, Ems. Thanks.
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

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    #9

    Re: boor

    "Berk" itself is not considered particularly rude at all. However, anyone who knows the origin of it might be rather upset if they thought you were calling them the word that rhymes with the end of "Berkeley hunt".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: boor

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    the word that rhymes with the end of "Berkeley hunt".
    I've always known it as 'Berkshire Hunt'.

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