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  1. VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
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    #11

    Re: "Where's he?" vs. "Where's it?"

    Quote Originally Posted by tree123 View Post
    To my the best of my knowledge, not every British person pronounces good English.
    That depends on what you mean by 'good English'. All native speakers produce their own dialect of English naturally with the appropriate pronunciation.

  2. Member
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    #12

    Re: "Where's he?" vs. "Where's it?"

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    I would never say "where's he." It's not natural. "Where is he" is. Or even "where's he at."

    "where is he" would usually sound like "where izzy," so the idea that the H is not always vocalized is correct.

    But, the vowel sounds in "he" and "it" are completely different and would not be confused. "It"ends with a T and "he" doesn't. There are many reasons why these would never be confused.
    I've watched another video in which the Chinese teacher also indicates some Americans do not pronounce "t" if "it" is at the end of a sentence. However I am unable to find out which video I've watched right now. If I find it, I will upload it.

    I feel some native speakers don't consciously realize these subtleties.
    Please correct my writing if there's any grammatical solecism.

  3. Member
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    #13

    Re: "Where's he?" vs. "Where's it?"

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    That depends on what you mean by 'good English'. All native speakers produce their own dialect of English naturally with the appropriate pronunciation.
    I heard about some British people are/were accent conscious if not all.

    Received Pronunciation is an accent of Standard English in the United Kingdom and is defined in the Concise Oxford English Dictionary as "the standard accent of English as spoken in the south of England"
    The quoted words are from Wikipedia which indicates "standard English" with received Pronunciation.

    There was a film named My Fair Lady starred by Audrey Hepburn. She was a florist. And her accent was corrected by a linguist and professor in the film. It was adapted on the drama of George Bernard Shaw who also commented on the accents.

    I read an article before it was said some people who are native speakers were discriminated because of their accents according to a survey.

    I think the British society has changed, and maybe the Received Pronunciation is not as important as it was before.

    P.S. I'm not sure if I am allowed to talk about these, though I've talked on this thread. I'm not going further. If any of you would like to share more your opinion about the accent or pronunciation, I'll read and appreciate. You old timers know the house rule better than I do.
    Last edited by tree123; 06-Jun-2019 at 14:13.
    Please correct my writing if there's any grammatical solecism.

  4. Moderator
    Interested in Language
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    #14

    Re: "Where's he?" vs. "Where's it?"

    Quote Originally Posted by tree123 View Post
    A Canadian from Quebec I know doesn't write good English.
    Most Quebeckers speak French as their first language. Many of them also speak English as a second language. It's not unusual for a Quebecker to make errors in written English.
    I am not a teacher.

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