Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
    • Posts: 863
    #1

    it be

    Imagine that you are visiting a new city for the first time as a tourist, whether it be Paris, London, Sydney, Rome, or New York City.

    I don't understand the whole sentence too well, however, I can imagine what they are talking about. Anyway, I don't understand why "be" was used there, at all! I'd say "it is" instead?
    Why was "be" used there?


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #2

    Re: it be

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Imagine that you are visiting a new city for the first time as a tourist, whether it be Paris, London, Sydney, Rome, or New York City.

    I don't understand the whole sentence too well, however, I can imagine what they are talking about. Anyway, I don't understand why "be" was used there, at all! I'd say "it is" instead?
    Why was "be" used there?
    The subjunctive is being used here but you're right, Lenka, <it's> could also be used.

    If you were visiting a new city for the first time as a tourist, whether it be Paris, London, Sydney, Rome, or New York City, ... .


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 150
    #3

    Re: it be

    Because we are imagining various possibilities, the subjunctive be is used. Whether to use "be" or "is" may simply be a matter of style.


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #4

    Re: it be

    I'm not trying to make a big deal out of this but in English we can imagine in many ways without using the subjunctive.

    If you are visiting; Say you're/were visiting; Imagine you are/were visting' Pretend you're visiting, ...

    There is nothing magical about the subjunctive. There are a few remaining forms left over from older forms of English. For each subjunctive form that still exists, English has at least one other way of describing the same situation.

    The subjunctive is not always needed, nor is it always desireable and it certainly isn't always the "correct" form.


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    #5

    Re: it be

    Hi Lenka,
    I've never seen such a pattern (which doesn't mean it's wrong of course), I mean whether it be. Sure it's the Subjunctive, only if I were asked to correct it, I'd write
    ... as a tourist, be it Paris...

    Regards

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •