Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. VIP Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 5,339
    #1

    There is a room booked under the name John Cena in this hotel.

    There is a room booked under the name John Cena in this hotel.

    Please check my sentence.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 17-Jun-2019 at 07:43. Reason: two further sentences deleted

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 49,788
    #2

    Re: There is a room booked under the name John Cena in this hotel.

    Who are you saying this to? Are you pretending to be John Cena? If not, who is he and why are you telling someone there is a room booked for him?

    You can use either preposition there but it's still not a natural sentence without context.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 27,960
    #3

    Re: There is a room booked under the name John Cena in this hotel.

    I deleted two further sentences from this thread in moderation, as I knew there was going to be enough to discuss with just this one.

    You can post them (one at a time) as supplementary questions in this thread when you have answered ems's questions above.

  4. VIP Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 5,339
    #4

    Re: There is a room booked under the name John Cena in this hotel.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Who are you saying this to? Are you pretending to be John Cena? If not, who is he and why are you telling someone there is a room booked for him?

    You can use either preposition there but it's still not a natural sentence without context.

    Sorry, I didn't want to write Cena there (it is a mistake). John is a customer standing at a hotel's reception for whom a room has been booked in that hotel. He is checking in.

    I have forgotten what other two sentences were (that you deleted).

  5. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 27,960
    #5

    Re: There is a room booked under the name John Cena in this hotel.

    I suggest you keep a record of sentences you ask about, because I do that a lot.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 49,788
    #6

    Re: There is a room booked under the name John Cena in this hotel.

    He would probably say to the receptionist "I have a reservation. My name is John Cena". I don't know why you said that you didn't mean to write "Cena". He would need to give his surname to the receptionist. There's no point in him saying "I'm John. I have a reservation".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. jutfrank's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 7,738
    #7

    Re: There is a room booked under the name John Cena in this hotel.

    Here's an unlikely dialogue that would probably never happen.

    A: Good morning. I have a reservation.
    B: Good morning, Sir. What name, please?
    A: John Cena.
    B: John Cena? As in TV presenter, rapper, and WWE legend John Cena?
    A: Oh, did I say John Cena? Sorry, I meant John Smith. That's S-M-I-T-H.
    B: Thank you, Sir. Here's your key. Room 238. Have a nice day, Mr Cena. I mean, Mr Smith.

  8. VIP Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 5,339
    #8

    Re: There is a room booked under the name John Cena in this hotel.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    He would probably say to the receptionist "I have a reservation. My name is John Cena". I don't know why you said that you didn't mean to write "Cena". He would need to give his surname to the receptionist. There's no point in him saying "I'm John. I have a reservation".

    If there is another person who is asking receptionist about John's reservation then what does he need to say "There is a room booked "in" or "under" the name John Smith. Can I get the room number please"?

  9. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 49,788
    #9

    Re: There is a room booked under the name John Cena in this hotel.

    Did you read the fourth sentence in post #2?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  10. VIP Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 5,339
    #10

    Re: There is a room booked under the name John Cena in this hotel.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Did you read the fourth sentence in post #2?

    Morris at the hotel's reception: Hi, there is a room booked "under" or "in" (both under and in can be used here. Am I correct?) the name John Smith in this hotel.

    Receptionist: Yes, there is but may I know who are you?

    Morris: I am John's friend. Could you please tell me his room number?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •