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    #1

    Let him go to America.

    Let's say I am talking to Jane about Tom. In this case, can the sentence below have two different meanings?



    Let (allow) him go to America. (I am in imperative mood and I want Jane allows Tom going to America, in other words I use the verb (let) as a second person form of imperative)


    Let him go to America. (I am in imperative mood again but I directly want Tom going to America, in other words I use "let him go" as a third person form of imperative)
    Last edited by ringu20; 19-Jun-2019 at 16:40.

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    #2

    Re: Let him go to America.

    I can't see the difference in meaning you're talking about.

    Quote Originally Posted by ringu20 View Post
    I directly want Tom going to America
    What does this mean?

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    #3

    Re: Let him go to America.

    I mean in the second example, I don't want Jane allows Tom going to America. I want Tom going to Ameria. In the second example, I don't use "let " as a synonym of "allow" or "permit". I just use the structure "let him/his/it verb" that is used in the third person form of imperative clause.

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    #4

    Re: Let him go to America.

    Quote Originally Posted by ringu20 View Post
    Let's say I am talking to Jane about Tom. In this case, can the sentence below have two different meanings?

    1. Let (allow) him go to America. (I am in using the imperative mood and I want Jane allows to allow Tom going to go to America. In other words, I use am using the verb (let) as a second person form of the imperative.
    2. Let him go to America. (I am in using the imperative mood again but I directly want Tom going to go to America. In other words, I use am using "let him go" as a third person form of the imperative.
    Note my corrections above.

    I don't think you understand the imperative. It can't be used in the third person. An imperative is always directed at one other person or several other people. If you're telling one person to do something, it's the second person singular. If you're telling several people to do something, it's the second person plural.

    Quote Originally Posted by ringu20 View Post
    I mean In the second example, I don't want Jane allows to allow Tom going to go to America. I want Tom going to go to America. In the second example, I don't use am not using "let " as a synonym of "allow" or "permit". I am just use using the structure "let him/his her/it + verb" that is used in the third person form of an imperative clause.
    Note my corrections above.

    Honestly, I don't know what you're talking about here! There is no such structure as "Let him/her/it + verb" that is somehow third person. If you start a sentence with "Let" in that way, it has to be an imperative so it has to be in the second person. Also, "let" is a synonym of "allow" and "permit". You can't just decide that it's not.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: Let him go to America.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    There is no such structure as "Let him/her/it + verb" that is somehow third person.
    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/gra...auses-be-quiet

    "Third person imperatives are not common; they are formed with let + him/her/it or a noun phrase:"

    [B is joking]

    A:
    How will Patrick know which house is ours?


    B:
    Let him knock on all the doors until he finds ours!


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    #6

    Re: Let him go to America.

    Quote Originally Posted by ringu20 View Post
    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/gra...auses-be-quiet

    "Third person imperatives are not common; they are formed with let + him/her/it or a noun phrase:"
    I cannot see how these can be called a third person imperative.

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    #7

    Re: Let him go to America.

    Quote Originally Posted by ringu20 View Post
    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/gra...auses-be-quiet

    "Third person imperatives are not common; they are formed with let + him/her/it or a noun phrase:"

    NOT A TEACHER


    Hello, Ringu:

    I have found three more examples in a book written by four respected grammarians. They agree that such sentences are "archaic and elevated in tone."

    1. "Let no one think that a teacher's life is easy."
    2. "Let each man decide for himself."
    3. "If anyone shrinks from this action, let him speak now."


    Randolph Quirk, Sidney Greenbaum, Geoffrey Leech, and Jan Svartvik, A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (1985), pages 829 - 830.

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    #8

    Re: Let him go to America.

    Quote Originally Posted by ringu20 View Post
    Let him knock on all the doors until he finds ours!
    This doesn't strike me as the same as the examples TheParser gives.

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    #9

    Re: Let him go to America.

    "Somebody help me"

    "Somebody call the ambulance"


    Aren't these phrases also third person imperative?

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    #10

    Re: Let him go to America.

    No. They are addressed to 'somebody', one or more unnamed people.

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