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  1. Member
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    #1

    worked/has worked

    --Any news about Jason? I havenít seen him for years.
    --He ( ) in a company for two years. Now heís a soldier.

    A. worked
    B. works
    C. has worked
    D. will work

    (from my exercise book)

    The answer key is A, which I can understand. But I think C is also possible. Maybe Jason just made the change a short time ago. What do you say?

  2. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: worked/has worked

    It doesn't matter if the change was a short time ago. C is not good. The correct answer is A.

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    #3

    Re: worked/has worked

    Has worked means he's still working there now. That's unlikely if he's a soldier.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: worked/has worked

    Let’s suppose this situation.

    Tom just quit the army in the morning. I wonder if it’s possible for his friend to ask him in the afternoon ‘How long have you been in the army?’

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    #5

    Re: worked/has worked

    Yes, that would be appropriate since he quit the army only in the "recent past".
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  6. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: worked/has worked

    It is possible that his friend might use the present perfect to ask the question, but he would need a good reason to do so. It doesn't matter how recently Tom quit, if his friend is seeing Tom's being in the army as a finished past event, he'll use the past simple.

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    #7

    Re: worked/has worked

    Quote Originally Posted by diamondcutter View Post
    Let’s suppose this situation.

    Tom just quit the army in the morning. I wonder if it’s possible for his friend to ask him in the afternoon ‘How long have you been in the army?’
    His friend would only use the present perfect if he thought Tom was still in the army. How long have you been in the army? means "I see that you are currently in the army. I wonder how long that has been the case."
    I am not a teacher.

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: worked/has worked

    Even one second after quitting (and therefore no longer being a solder), the question should be "How long were you in the army?"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: worked/has worked

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Even one second after quitting (and therefore no longer being a solder), the question should be "How long were you in the army?"
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/t...+soccer+player

    Touchstone: Let’s suppose David Beckham just announced retirement this morning. Can we say both ‘For the last 20 years, David Beckham was a very famous soccerplayer’ and ‘For the last 20 years, David Beckham has been a very famous soccer player’? Some books say the present perfect can also express a state which just stopped.

    Rover KE: Yes, you can, and yes it can.

    Now, I'm confused. Would you please enlighten me?


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    #10

    Re: worked/has worked

    Quote Originally Posted by diamondcutter View Post
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/t...+soccer+player

    Touchstone: Let’s suppose David Beckham just announced retirement this morning. Can we say both ‘For the last 20 years, David Beckham was a very famous soccerplayer’ and ‘For the last 20 years, David Beckham has been a very famous soccer player’? Some books say the present perfect can also express a state which just stopped.

    Rover KE: Yes, you can, and yes it can.

    Now, I'm confused. Would you please enlighten me?

    He remains a famous soccer player even though he's no longer active.
    I am not a teacher.

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