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  1. teechar's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    I suppose I could Google this, but I wonder if you could tell me how you understand the terms "open" and "closed syllable". They mean nothing to me.
    The whole thing is a complete waste of time, if you ask me.

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    #12

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    I can post! It seems to me that rule doesn't always work. Ra -open syllable bbit-closed, paper-pa-open syllable, per closed. If the teach to pay attention to the ending of the word then both words have consonants at their ends, in paper, pa is pronounced alphabetically but in rabbit, the ra is not, since it's ˈræ' not 'rei'.

    It says these words are open syllable- words
    to-tal, ri-val that's why they are pronounced alphabetically, like 'rabbit' these words end with consonants, but unlike them the word 'rabbit' is pronounced as ræbit not as reibit.
    Last edited by Rachel Adams; 28-Jun-2019 at 09:13.

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    #13

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    I can post! It seems to me that rule doesn't always work. Ra -open syllable bbit-closed, paper-pa-open syllable, per closed. If the teach to pay attention to the ending of the word then both words have consonants at their ends, in paper, pa is pronounced alphabetically but in rabbit, the ra is not, since it's ˈræ' not 'rei'.

    It says these words are open syllable- words
    to-tal, ri-val that's why they are pronounced alphabetically, like 'rabbit' these words end with consonants, but unlike them the word 'rabbit' is pronounced as ræbit not as reibit.
    I couldn't help myself and looked up the meanings of the terms. Rabbit begins with a closed syllable — the first syllable ends with a consonant, and its vowel is not pronounced like the name of the letter.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #14

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    I've just been introduced to this concept, and I am not sure it's worth paying attention to.
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  5. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #15

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    It does seem to be a hair-splitting concepts that muddies the waters- I can't really see how this makes learning more efficient.

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    #16

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    There are numerous exceptions. What about short "closed syllable" words that you add an "e" to thus changing the pronunciation? (I could make a list of some, but what would be the point?) Those words are still one syllable words.
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    #17

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    U doesn't fit well in this rule, at least not in American English. It's usually pronounced [u] in open syllables, rather than [ju], as its name is pronounced.
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    #18

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    Ba na na is an open syllable- word but 'ba' is not pronounced like the name of the letter either.

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    #19

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    ''Rabbit begins with a closed syllable — the first syllable ends with a consonant, and its vowel is not pronounced like the name of the letter''.-I read only in open syllables the vowels are pronounced like the names of the letters.

    What do you think about the 'ba' 'na' 'na' example? An example of an open-syllable word which is not pronounced as it should accroding to the rule they suggest.

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    #20

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    What do you think about the 'ba' 'na' 'na' example? An example of an open-syllable word which is not pronounced as it should according to the rule they suggest.
    It's one of many words that demonstrate that the "rule" is at best a guideline.
    I am not a teacher.

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