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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    Closed and open syllables

    Hello.

    Are these words
    multisyllable words with only ''baby'' being open syllable and the rest close syllable?
    ba
    by -open syllable
    e ven-closed syllable
    pa per -closed syllable
    mu sic-closed syllable

  2. VIP Member
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    #2

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    I suppose I could Google this, but I wonder if you could tell me how you understand the terms "open" and "closed syllable". They mean nothing to me.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Hello.

    Are these words
    multisyllable words with only ''baby'' being open syllable and the rest closed syllable?
    ba
    by -open syllable
    e ven-closed syllable
    pa per -closed syllable
    mu sic-closed syllable
    No. They are all open syllable words. In fact, the way you divide the words into syllables illustrates that.
    Not a professional teacher

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    I suppose I could Google this, but I wonder if you could tell me how you understand the terms "open" and "closed syllable". They mean nothing to me.
    The website that explained them to me uses the same examples as Rachel.
    Not a professional teacher

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    #5

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    e ven - closed syllable

    mu sic - closed syllable

  6. Senior Member
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    #6

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    Ba by -is an open syllable, isn't it?

  7. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Ba by -is an open syllable, isn't it?
    From what you've learned about syllables, how many syllables do you think baby has? Are they open or closed?

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    #8

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    Do they mean that the words they listed are all open syllable words? ''Ba'' is followed by ''by'' but they are both counted separately, so even though ''ba'' is followed by a ''b'' (''by''), ''ba'' is not a closed syllable, right? I thought I should pay attention to the word ending only, if there is a vowel at the end of the word. To decide whether a multisyllable word is open or closed syllable word I must pay attention to its ending only, right?


    There aren’t many one-syllable words that contain open syllables, but there are many multisyllable words that do. For example, look at the first syllables in these words:

    ba by
    e ven
    pa per
    mu sic

  9. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    To decide whether a multisyllable word is open or closed syllable word I must pay attention to its ending only, right?
    It's the syllable that is either open or closed, not the word. That means that a multisyllabic word can consist of some closed and some open ones.

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    #10

    Re: Closed and open syllables

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    On a Russian website I read that open-syllable words are pronounced alphabetically as in 'baby' and ''music'' the vowels 'a' in ''baby'' and ''u'' in 'music' bbi ˈmjuːzɪk so they teach to pay attention if the word has a vowel at the end. But ''music'' doesn't have a vowel at the end, and it is still pronounced ''alphabetically. Rabbit and napkin are closed syllables like music . Paper is a closed syllable but the a is pronounced 'ei' as it is usually pronounced in open syllables. I am lost!
    Rachel was unable to post the above.

    See this thread.

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