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    #11

    Re: people suffered (throug) many wars.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    If you omit through, you also lose the meaning that the word brings to the sentence. Is this what you're really asking about? What through contributes to the meaning of the sentence?
    Yes, that's what I wanted to ask. I wonder what's the difference in meaning between with 'through' and without 'through' in that context.
    Last edited by diamondcutter; 15-Jul-2019 at 00:11.

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: people suffered (throug) many wars.

    Please tell me what you think it means to suffer war. (That's what you get if you take "through" out of that sentence.)
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    #13

    Re: people suffered (throug) many wars.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    teechar—I'm wondering now how you didn't pick up on the above, which is neither interrogative nor an independent sentence, and which is used in exactly the same way—to act as an addend to the question.
    I didn't spot it, to be honest. I just saw the last part, and that's why I wrote that comment.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    Even though you've made it clear that you don't like my style, can you at least understand why I decided to present things that way?
    Of course I can. However, we're always telling learners not to write sentences such as:

    How to understand the meaning of the following sentence?

    Therefore, I think we should practise what we preach, so to speak. We should model the correct punctuation for them. Otherwise, they'll go right ahead and emulate what we write, and would/could/should we blame them then?

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    #14

    Re: people suffered (throug) many wars.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    Please tell me what you think it means to suffer war. (That's what you get if you take "through" out of that sentence.)
    I think to suffer war means to experience the bad things in war and to suffer through war maybe means to experience the bad things from the beginning to the end of war. And there’s no much difference between them.

    I'd like to see your comments on my understanding.

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    #15

    Re: people suffered (throug) many wars.

    The term suffer war is new to me. If you are making up the term then I suppose you can also make up the definition. (It's possible the phrase has been used before, and I just haven't run across it.)
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    #16

    Re: people suffered (throug) many wars.

    This is my understanding.

    People say both to suffer a disease and to suffer from a disease, but people only say to suffer through war, not to suffer war.

    I'd like to see your comments.

  7. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #17

    Re: people suffered (throug) many wars.

    I advise you not to use suffer war.

    Although we do sometimes use suffer as a transitive verb, it's not particularly natural to use war as an object.

    Mind you, it's not particularly common to use suffer through war, either. I advise you to focus on using suffer intransitively, using whatever preposition is appropriate to what you want to say.

    I think you're essentially asking two unrelated questions in this thread: the first about the transitive use of suffer and the second about the use of the preposition through in the example sentence. Don't confuse these two distinct questions.
    Last edited by jutfrank; 17-Jul-2019 at 00:53.

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    #18

    Re: people suffered (throug) many wars.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post

    Mind you, it's not particularly common to use suffer through war, either.
    I'd like to know what is more common than suffer through war to express the similar meaning.

  9. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #19

    Re: people suffered (throug) many wars.

    Quote Originally Posted by diamondcutter View Post
    I'd like to know what is more common than suffer through war to express the similar meaning.
    Stop thinking about suffer through war. There is no such phrase.

    Which preposition you use depends on what you mean to say. through works fine in the example sentence you give in post #1, but that doesn't mean that you should connect suffer with through war.

    Millions suffered in the First World War.
    During the war, they suffered greatly.
    Many suffered from shell shock after the war.
    She suffered over many months.


    If you want to make up your own example sentence, we'll be happy to tell you which preposition fits best what you mean.

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