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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    If you have the time

    Source : Grammar Zone by Neungryul Education, p63, B

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    As I know, the difference between 1 and 2 is that 1 is about whether you have some free time to do an activity,
    while 2 is about if you know the hour and minute of the present time.
    1. Do you have time?
    2. Do you have the time?

    As in the picture, it must have been written by a native speaker, but I don't know why he or she said like this, not "have time".
    If you have the time, read it!
    I think this book is spectacular....
    Last edited by keannu; 16-Jul-2019 at 06:13.

  2. VIP Member
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    #2

    Re: If you have the time

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post

    As I know, the difference between 1 and 2 is that 1 is about whether you have some free time to do an activity,
    while 2 is about if you know the hour and minute of the present time.
    1. Do you have time?
    2. Do you have the time?
    In the context of asking whether somebody has time free for something, #2 is not significantly different in meaning from #1.

  3. Senior Member
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    #3

    Re: If you have the time

    Not a teacher.

    Keannu's perception is correct.

    It may be, though, that a more modern way to ask for the time is simply "Would you know what time it is?".

    It's also true that one could ask, "Do you have the time to do this?". The article is now required because the matter in question is whether one is free for a specific task. And similarly "If you have the time, read it": to read it is a specific task.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 16-Jul-2019 at 07:42. Reason: see below

  4. VIP Member
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    #4

    Re: If you have the time

    Quote Originally Posted by abaka View Post
    It may be, though, that a more modern way to ask for the time is simply "Would you know what time it is?"
    I do not agree that this is a 'more modern way'.

    It's also true that one could ask, "Do you have the time to do this?". The article is now required because the matter in question is whether one is free for a specific task.
    The article is not required. "Do you have time time to do this?" is perfectly acceptable.

  5. Moderator
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    #5

    Re: If you have the time

    abaka, welcome back after your five-year break.

    Please remember that when replying to posts you need to state that you are not a teacher.

    EDIT:
    I've just read your 'interests' on your profile page. You could put that information in a signature line.

    To do that, click on Settings, then Edit Signature.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 16-Jul-2019 at 12:38.

  6. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: If you have the time

    The author says "Even though it takes a lot of time ...", so I think "the time" refers to "a lot of time it takes to read this book".

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