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Thread: Yup, what's up?

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    #1

    Yup, what's up?

    Hi.

    This question was already asked on WordReference. I didn't get the answer I want.

    Context:

    I met a woman online recently. We practice speaking English. The second day after we met she sent me a message, the following was part of the conversation.

    Jessica: Hi, Silver. Are you on a lunch break?
    Silver: Yup, what’s up?

    According to members there, “Yup, what’s up" is wrong. I wonder if the following options are natural:

    Yup, what can I do for you?
    Yup, what’s the matter?
    Yup, what’s the problem?

    My intended meaning is “"Yes, I'm on a lunch break, perhaps you want to practice speaking English with me or what can I do for you"? I think “Yup, what’s up” is natural in this context because it’s a synonym of “What’s the matter”.

    May I have your opinion?
    Last edited by Silverobama; 17-Jul-2019 at 14:49. Reason: correct mistakes

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    #2

    Re: Yup, what's up?

    Yes, it's correct and natural.

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    #3

    Re: Yup, what's up?

    Why did they say it was wrong? It is perfectly natural informal conversational English.

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    #4

    Re: Yup, what's up?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Why did they say it was wrong? It is perfectly natural informal conversational English.
    Wordreference is a good place to learn, but rules are a bit strict.

    I don't know why they said it's wrong. I looked up "What's wrong"and I found it means "What's the matter", this means that "What's wrong" is just a right response to my friend's question.

    One last question. I wonder if all these options are natural or just the three Italic ones.

    Yup, what’s up?
    Yup, what can I do for you?
    Yup, what’s the matter?
    Yup, what’s the problem?

  5. teechar's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Yup, what's up?

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post
    I met a woman online recently. We practice speaking English. The second day after we met, she sent me a message, the following was part of the conversation.

    Jessica: Hi, Silver. Are you on your lunch break?
    Silver: Yup, what’s up?
    That's okay, but you're still making the comma splice error (highlighted in blue).

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post
    I wonder if the following options are natural:
    Yup, what can I do for you?
    Yup, what’s the matter?
    Yup, what’s the problem?

    My intended meaning is “"Yes, I'm on a lunch break, perhaps you want to practice speaking English with me or what can I do for you"? I think “Yup, what’s up” is natural in this context because it’s a synonym of “What’s the matter”.
    I wouldn't use any of those three in that context.

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    #6

    Re: Yup, what's up?

    I think comma splices are okay when the first clause is a single-syllable word.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: Yup, what's up?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Why did they say it was wrong? It is perfectly natural informal conversational English.
    Not to septuagenarian Brits.

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    #8

    Re: Yup, what's up?

    I have a problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post


    What can I do for you?
    What’s the matter?
    What’s the problem?

    All of those are appropriate responses to the sentence in blue.
    Not a professional teacher

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    #9

    Re: Yup, what's up?

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post
    Wordreference is a good place to learn, but rules are a bit strict.

    I don't know why they said it's wrong. I looked up "What's wrong"and I found it means "What's the matter", this means that "What's wrong" is just a right response to my friend's question.

    One last question. I wonder if all these options are natural or just the three Italic ones.

    Yup, what’s up?
    Yup, what can I do for you?
    Yup, what’s the matter?
    Yup, what’s the problem?
    I don't know why you are assuming there is a problem or something is the matter. The prompt was "are you on a lunch break?"

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