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    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    #1

    Sick vs Ill

    Hi,
    AFAIK there are some AE-BE differences here. I’d like somebody to elaborate on the words’ usage.
    If I say I am sick (no context), Brits (hope it’s not pejorative) will think I’m about to throw up. The same with Americans?
    1. The old lady is in bed. She’s been ill for a week.
    2. The old lady is in bed. She’s been sick for a week.
    TIA

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: Sick vs Ill

    Hi, Humble

    I am sick (e.g., I have a cold, etc.)
    I am going to be sick (i.e., I'm going to vomit)

    Try these on for size.

    1. A desperately sick (ill)child,

    2. ...when she became ill with leukemia .(Ill is better than sick for serious illnesses).

    3. If you get sick. (ill)..

    4. The kitchen now becomes totally ill equipped. (Not sick. Ill equipped means badly equipped).

    5. Don't wait until illness (sickness) strikes before coming up with a sick-day (not ill-day)
    plan.

    6. ...feels less guilty about calling in sick (sick is more natural than "calling in ill").

    7.One of her daughters is ill.(sick)

    8. ...payment for sick leave... (Not ill-leave).

    9. ...share hope and a hug with these sick kids! (ill)

    10. ... If you know a child who's ill...(sick)

    11. ...seriously ill children...(more natural than seriously sick.)

    12. ..sick Leave...(Not ill leave).

    13. ...Sick days...(not ill days)

    14. ...called in sick (not ill) at least once when they weren't ill. (sick).

    15. ...sick time allowance ...(not ill).

    All the best,


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 671
    #3

    Re: Sick vs Ill

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    Hi,
    AFAIK there are some AE-BE differences here. I’d like somebody to elaborate on the words’ usage.
    If I say I am sick (no context), Brits (hope it’s not pejorative) will think I’m about to throw up. The same with Americans?
    1. The old lady is in bed. She’s been ill for a week.
    2. The old lady is in bed. She’s been sick for a week.
    TIA
    In normal Br.E, only "I'm feeling sick" carries the direct connotation of "I'm about to throw up", although "I'm feeling ill" might do. Otherwise, 'sick' and 'ill' are almost synonymous in these contexts nowadays.


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    #4

    Re: Sick vs Ill

    Thanks to both of you. Casiopea, you’ve gone to the whole nine yards, very helpful, indeed.

  2. #5

    Re: Sick vs Ill

    I occasionally hear people saying "I'm sick of this", which uses sick to mean that that person no longer wants to have any thing to do with what they're talking about. For example:

    "I'm sick of David". The person is tired of David.
    "I'm sick of the amount of homework we get". The person hates the amount of homework received.
    "I'm sick of falling over". The person is tired of falling over.


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    #6

    Re: Sick vs Ill

    Oh sorry,some questions. I don’t understand:
    1. Don't wait until illness (sickness) strikes before coming up with a sick-day (not ill-day)
    plan.
    2. …feels less guilty about calling in sick
    3. Sick days
    4. sick time allowance
    Tnx

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Feb 2005
    • Posts: 2,585
    #7

    Re: Sick vs Ill

    Hello Humble

    1. This means "prepare a plan for the days when you are unable to work because you are ill", by e.g. arranging for someone to take your phone calls, check your emails, etc. in your absence.

    2. To "call in sick" is "to advise your employer that you will be absent because of illness".

    3. "Sick days" are days when you don't go to work because you're ill.

    4. "Sick time allowance" relates to sickness benefit or pay in the US, I believe. (Perhaps a US member will be able to provide a fuller explanation.)

    All the best,

    MrP


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    #8

    Re: Sick vs Ill

    Tnx for your help, MrP.

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