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    #1

    Preposition 'in'.

    Suppose players of a cricket team get out of their dressing rooms and walk out on the ground. Once they are all out there, can we say 'The players are in the ground'?

    Some would say 'The players are on the ground' is correct. If yes, doesn't 'on' in the sentence suggests that they are on the ground in horizontal position?

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    #2

    Re: Preposition 'in'.

    It might, but "in the ground" definitely means under the surface of the soil. Which do you think is (at least slightly) better?

    I'm not familiar with cricket terms. Better to say, 'on the field' or 'on the pitch' or 'on the grounds'. I'm sure others more knowledgeable will chime in with the correct term.

    English prepositions can be a real headache for learners. Hang in there!

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    #3

    Re: Preposition 'in'.

    Quote Originally Posted by J&K Tutoring View Post
    It might, but "in the ground" definitely means under the surface of the soil. Which do you think is (at least slightly) better?

    I'm not familiar with cricket terms. Better to say, 'on the field' or 'on the pitch' or 'on the grounds'. I'm sure others more knowledgeable will chime in with the correct term.

    English prepositions can be a real headache for learners. Hang in there!
    Been hanging ever since I fancied English lang! :D

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    #4

    Re: Preposition 'in'.

    The word is pitch, not ground.

    The players walk out onto the pitch.

    We use the word ground to refer to the venue and pitch to refer to the playing area.

    So somebody could be at the cricket ground and on the cricket pitch.

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    #5

    Re: Preposition 'in'.

    Can we interchange the noun 'pitch' with 'field'?
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 10-Aug-2019 at 10:46. Reason: deleting the quote

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    #6

    Re: Preposition 'in'.

    I think people do refer to the playing area as a field too, yes.

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    #7

    Re: Preposition 'in'.

    The whole of the playing area is the cricket field.

    The pitch is 'the rectangular surface in the centre of the field where most of the action takes place. It is 22 yards in length'. (Wikipedia) The rest of the playing area is the outfield.

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    #8

    Re: Preposition 'in'.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    The word is pitch, not ground.

    The players walk out onto the pitch.

    We use the word ground to refer to the venue and pitch to refer to the playing area.

    So somebody could be at the cricket ground and on the cricket pitch.
    Not all 11 players in a cricket match are allowed to play on the pitch at the same time. Just 2 batsmen of an opponent team, one of whom stands at the bowling end, while the other at the batting end. The team, fielding first, chooses one of the bowlers in its team to bowl to the batsman of the opponent team. So, there are just 3 players staying, playing, or moving along or across the pitch.

    Would it be wrong to say 'The players are in the ground' when considering the ground a place surrounded by fences or having boundries all round. I read 'in' can be used for places or spaces surrounding you or covering you, or in other words 'in' is used for inclusion when a place has boundries or fences.

    A cricket playground is mostly surrounded by fences, and beyond fences are the tiers of seats all around the ground.
    Last edited by Rollercoaster1; 10-Aug-2019 at 16:57.

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    #9

    Re: Preposition 'in'.

    If team A is batting and team B is fielding, it is correct -- in cricket but certainly not in baseball -- to say that both teams are on the field, and team B is in the field.

    In your sense I should use "on".
    Retired proofreader. ESL tutor. Not a teacher. Nor a typist, evidently.

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    #10

    Re: Preposition 'in'.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rollercoaster1 View Post
    Would it be wrong to say 'The players are in the ground' when considering the ground a place surrounded by fences or having boundries all round.
    Probably, yes, but it depends on context. Like I told you, if you're using ground to refer to the venue (which it seems you are), then use at. You'd need a special reason to use in. Whom do you imagine saying this sentence?

    If you mean to focus on the fact that the players are on the pitch or on the field, then say that.

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