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  1. Skrej's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: Hell be 20 years old tomorrow./Hes going to be 20 years old tomorrow.

    We also use the 'going to' form when there is evidence or signs to indicate something's likely to happen. Sometimes this is expressed as predictions based on evidence, as opposed to predictions based on opinion (will).

    So, unless something unexpected like death happens before midnight tonight, he's going to be 20 tomorrow.

    With predictions in particular, there's a lot of overlap between using 'will' or 'going to'

    You can also look at a dozen different sources, and not find 100% agreement on usage of 'will' vs. 'going to' because it's not always easy to neatly pigeonhole the situation into one category or the other.

    I think I'd actually be more likely to use the 'going to' form for the 20th birthday example, but both are so natural I doubt I'd even notice which version somebody else used to express the idea.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  2. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: Hell be 20 years old tomorrow./Hes going to be 20 years old tomorrow.

    Quote Originally Posted by diamondcutter View Post
    I think hell be 20 years old tomorrow also expresses a definite fact and according to the point of view above, going to structure couldnt be used to replace will in this sentence.
    No, that is not what the writer means by 'definite fact'. The example Oil will float on water is an example of the use of will to make a statement of expectation. You might think of this sentence as more of a generalisation about what tends always to happen than a statement about a specific future event, as is the example about the birthday.

    That is to say:
    Hes going to be 20 years old tomorrow.
    Hell be 20 years old tomorrow.
    Because of what I said above, the reasoning here is not right. Both sentences above are possible.

    Maybe the book is wrong or maybe my understanding is not correct. Its pity that I dont remember which book it is.
    You misunderstood what the writer meant. This may have been due to the rather vague term 'definite fact'. Are you sure the writer used that term or did you make it up?

  3. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #13

    Re: Hell be 20 years old tomorrow./Hes going to be 20 years old tomorrow.

    You could say:

    He'll turn twenty tomorrow.
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  4. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #14

    Re: Hell be 20 years old tomorrow./Hes going to be 20 years old tomorrow.

    You can also avoid using modality and aspect altogether by saying:

    He turns 20 tomorrow.
    He's 20 tomorrow.

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