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Thread: be directed to

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    #1

    be directed to

    Today, before I paid for a plan on a website, I came across this.

    XX does not process or store credit card numbers. Once you click Continue, you will be directed to a secure third-party processing site to complete the electronic payment transaction. You will not be able to use the Back button on your browser to cancel this transaction.

    I originally asked the question here. https://forum.wordreference.com/thre...#post-18370091It was confirmed that "direct" is a common word in this context.

    So what is special about "direct" that makes it common in this context? Why is it not "moved/sent/taken" to a site?

    Last edited by emsr2d2; 25-Aug-2019 at 15:19. Reason: Removed unnecessary line breaks
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    #2

    Re: be directed to

    "Sent" or "taken" would work equally well. "Moved" wouldn't. I don't think there's anything special about "direct" except that in computer language, the word has always been used when a command (click etc) goes to another page or another section.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: be directed to

    Transfered ("transferred" in British English) would also be logical. Directed just happens to be the conventional word for this context.
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    #4

    Re: be directed to


    So what is special about "X" that makes it common in this context? Why is it not "Y/Z"?


    There is very often no clear answer to this question. It just happens that more people use X initially. As a result, even people who initially use Y or Z initially tend to switch to X simply because that appears to the to be the normal word.

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