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  1. Senior Member
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    #11

    Re: Is confusing naming of grammatical rules common in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I know it's a typo, but did you mean to write "curse" or "coarse"?
    "Curse", but now that I think about it, it would've been better to use "coarse". Thank you.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: Is confusing naming of grammatical rules common in English?

    "Retarded" isn't considered to be a "curse" word (that would be a swear word in BrE), nor even "coarse" language. It's potentially offensive, even when it's not being used to describe someone with a mental impairment.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. probus's Avatar
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    #13

    Re: Is confusing naming of grammatical rules common in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    You should be aware that the use of "retarded" as a pejorative is frowned upon. Maybe you meant it literally. I'm not sure. Regardless, it is best avoided.
    It's not relevant to this thread but I can't resist pointing out that the medical profession no longer refers to people as retarded. Since the politically correct proscribed retarded doctors have switched to calling retarded people delayed. As far as I can see there has been no objection to that. The irony.
    Last edited by probus; 05-Sep-2019 at 03:30.

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    #14

    Re: Is confusing naming of grammatical rules common in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    Since the politically correct proscribed retarded .
    The word had come to be so widely used as some form of insult, that many people were unhappy with it still being used of people with learning difficulties. The same had happened in the past with words such as moron, imbecile and cretin, once used neutrally and objectively by doctors.

    My nephew is a slow learner. I would not like to hear him referred to officially as a cretin. Would you like it for a member of your family? It's the same with retarded. Its day has passed. If recognition of this is a sign of being politically correct, then I am happy to be politically correct.
    Last edited by Piscean; 05-Sep-2019 at 07:54. Reason: Mistake corrected

  5. Senior Member
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    #15

    Re: Is confusing naming of grammatical rules common in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    ...It's the same with retarded. Its day has past...
    Is that an alternative spelling of passed? I've never seen it. Am I missing something?

    Idiot, cretin, and debil used to be used in Poland. Now they're just offensive words meaning stupid.

    There was one famous case when one politician called our president an idiot, and defended himself in court saying he was referring to the medical term.

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    #16

    Re: Is confusing naming of grammatical rules common in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by Glizdka View Post
    Is that an alternative spelling of passed?
    No. It's a mistake, now corrected.

  7. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #17

    Re: Is confusing naming of grammatical rules common in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    If recognition of this is a sign of being politically correct, then I am happy to be politically correct.
    I see this as a good thing- the intentions behind it are well meant. When terms are constantly readjusted, it can get a bit much, but trying to be more accepting as a general rule is good for me.

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