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    #1

    "considerable" as "can be considered"?

    Can I use "considerable" to mean "can be considered" (consider-able)?
    `
    as in
    "That is considerable." (meaning "It can be considered." or "I can consider that.")

  1. Philly's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: "considerable" as "can be considered"?

    "That is considerable."
    .
    I'd say no, that would usually be much too literal. People would tend to understand your sentence to mean "That's a lot." or "That's significant."
    .
    It might work in just the right context and if your sentence was said in just the right way, but it would be better (and more typical) to say something like:
    "That's worth considering."
    - or -
    "I'll consider that."
    .
    etc.

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    #3

    Re: "considerable" as "can be considered"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    "I'll consider that."
    Why didn't you still use "I can consider that."? Is it because it sounds unnatural?

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "considerable" as "can be considered"?

    Quote Originally Posted by dihen View Post
    Why didn't you still use "I can consider that."? Is it because it sounds unnatural?
    No. I can't speak for Philly, but I'd guess that the reason was this: it means something else

    "I'll consider that" is a statement of intent.

    "I can consider that" is a concession - "If you were ill at the time of the exam, I can consider that"; also (probably more often, "I'll take that into consideration").

    There's also the case where "consider" takes an object and a complement: "I could consider that an insult".

    (I'm not sure if "complement" is the right word - this sort of technicality isn't really my thing. I'm here to learn. Correct away.)

    b

    ps - On re-reading, I see that 'this sort of technicality' could sound dismissive. It's certainly not. It means just what it says.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "considerable" as "can be considered"?

    Quote Originally Posted by dihen View Post
    Can I use "considerable" to mean "can be considered" (consider-able)?
    `
    as in
    "That is considerable." (meaning "It can be considered." or "I can consider that.")
    That might have been the original meaning. Today, the closest we come is "worthy of consideration", "significant".

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "considerable" as "can be considered"?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    No. I can't speak for Philly, but I'd guess that the reason was this: it means something else

    "I'll consider that" is a statement of intent.

    "I can consider that" is a concession - "If you were ill at the time of the exam, I can consider that"; also (probably more often, "I'll take that into consideration").

    There's also the case where "consider" takes an object and a complement: "I could consider that an insult".

    (I'm not sure if "complement" is the right word - this sort of technicality isn't really my thing. I'm here to learn. Correct away.)

    b

    ps - On re-reading, I see that 'this sort of technicality' could sound dismissive. It's certainly not. It means just what it says.
    Your use of complement is correct there. The words "an insult" complete the object "that" by renaming it.

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