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Thread: A new disease

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    #1

    A new disease

    A new disease

    Going out of the laboratory, the doctor said to Bob, his patient “I have a bad news and a good news for you. Which news do you want to listen/hear?” Bob replied “Good news is good for me”. “Your name is able to be given a new disease” The doctor said.

    Please correct my mistakes.
    Last edited by chunchuntthn; 11-Sep-2019 at 12:12.

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    #2

    Re: A new disease

    Quote Originally Posted by chunchuntthn View Post
    A new disease

    Going out of As he left/As he was leaving the laboratory, the doctor said to his patient, Bob, his patient “I have a bad news and a good news for you. Which news do you want to listen/ hear first?” Bob replied “Good news is good for me”. The doctor said,Your name is able to be given to We're going to name a new disease after you. the doctor said.

    Please correct my mistakes.
    See above.

    It would be more natural for Bob to say simply "The good news [please]". Also, it's unusual for a patient to be in a laboratory. I would expect the conversation to take place in the doctor's consulting/consultation room.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: A new disease

    This is my rewrite.
    After he left the laboratory, the doctor arrived at his consulting room where he met his patient, Bob. The doctor said to Bob “I have good news and bad new. Which do you want to hear first?” Bob replied “Good new please”. The doctor said “We are going to name a new disease after you”.

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    #4

    Re: A new disease

    “Which do you want to hear?”. When I consulted how to use “which”, I got the following structure. “Which + Noun+ auxiliary verb + Noun + verb?”
    Could you please explain for me why I write “which news do you want to hear first” is wrong?

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    #5

    Re: A new disease

    Quote Originally Posted by chunchuntthn View Post
    This is my rewrite.
    After he left the laboratory, the doctor arrived at his consulting room where he met his patient, Bob. The doctor said to Bob “I have good news and bad news. Which do you want to hear first?” Bob replied “The good news please”. The doctor said “We are going to name a new disease after you”.
    Note my corrections above.

    Quote Originally Posted by chunchuntthn View Post
    “Which do you want to hear?” (no full stop here) When I consulted was studying how to use “which”, I got found the following structure: “Which + Noun+ auxiliary verb + Noun + verb?”
    Could you please explain for to me why I writeWhich news do you want to hear first?” is wrong?
    Note my corrections above. Grammatically, "Which news do you want to hear first?" is fine. However, I was trying to make your dialogue more natural. Once the doctor has already used the word "news" twice in one sentence, he is unlikely to use it again in the next sentence. It's just not necessary.

    I can offer you a beef burger or a veggie burger. Which would you like?
    I test drove an MX5 and a Fiesta yesterday. I don't know which to buy.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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