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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Where can I train it ?

    Hello all !

    I'm here to just ask where can I "train" tenses from my last post (I have a small problem with Present Perfect and Past Simple).

    I'm just asking where can I train it, not for explanation. I want to get used to it, and from movies it's hard to get it. In books I can but it's hard to imagine it (when there are no time relevance).

  2. Senior Member
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    #2

    Re: Where can I train it ?

    This website has a great number of exercises dedicated to checking your grammar, including using tenses.

    If you're overwhelmed by how many exercises there are, hit CTRL+F and type in the specific topic you want to "train".

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Where can I train it ?

    I wouldn't use "train" for what you want to do. I'd say that you want to "study and practise" the use of tenses. Also, saying that you want to "train tenses" sounds as if you want to teach tenses to do something.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Junior Member
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    #4

    Re: Where can I train it ?

    Can tell me where is here something like "present perfect vs past simple" (of course when there are no time relevance)

    emsr2d2 thanks for correcting me. I was thinking which word to use and here it is :D

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    #5

    Re: Where can I train it ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Xenon View Post
    Can tell me where is here something like "present perfect vs past simple" (of course when there are no time relevance)
    Unless you are thinking of distancing in reality or directness, time is always relevant when we think of tenses. Can you try to explain exactly what you mean by 'no time relevance'?
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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    #6

    Re: Where can I train it ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Xenon View Post

    I'm just asking where can I train it, not for explanation. I want to get used to it, and from movies it's hard to get it. In books I can but it's hard to imagine it (when there are no time relevance).

    NOT A TEACHER



    Hello, Xenon:

    1. I have just read your closed thread in "Ask a Teacher." As a former American president used to say, "I feel your pain." The choice of tense can also be difficult for ordinary non-teacher native speakers like me.

    2. Son: I have something to confess. Last week, I cut classes three times. Instead of going to school, my buddies and I went to the movies.

    Mother (crying): I cannot believe it. Your father and I did / have done our best to teach you to do the right thing. "Where did we go wrong? / Where have we gone wrong?"

    I think that I know the correct answer, but I shan't/won't give it, lest I be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: Where can I train it ?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post

    I think that I know the correct answer, but I shan't/won't give it, lest I be incorrect.
    It would be interesting to know what you, a native speaker of AmE would say.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  8. Junior Member
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    #8

    Re: Where can I train it ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    Unless you are thinking of distancing in reality or directness, time is always relevant when we think of tenses. Can you try to explain exactly what you mean by 'no time relevance'?
    You know without (last week, since, for etc.) Sentences like : (Mark : went out of the elevator and says - "Why he let this happen." And in front of him people were running chaotically around the room.)

    Something like that.

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    #9

    Re: Where can I train it ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Xenon View Post
    You know without (last week, since, for etc.) Sentences like : (Mark : went out of the elevator and says - "Why he let this happen." And in front of him people were running chaotically around the room.)
    No sentence exists in isolation. The speaker has the context in their mind. Possible contexts are:

    1. The speaker is thinking of an occasion in the past previously mentioned, implied or thought of. They would use a past tense for the first two verbs.
    2. A very short time indeed after the actual events, so short that it is hardly past, the speaker might use the present perfect for both verbs or, if the saying something is still going on at the moment of speaking, might use the present continuous for the second verb.

    The tense of the verb in the quoted sentence will depend on the context Mark had in mind when he uttered those words.

    I'll repeat the words I started with: No sentence exists in isolation. The speaker has the context in their mind.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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