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  1. Newbie
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      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • Canada
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      • Canada

    • Join Date: Sep 2006
    • Posts: 4
    #1

    I or me

    Which is correct?

    There are three members in my family: my father, my mother, and I.
    There are three members in my family: my father, my mother, and me.

    Thanks for your help.

  2. Harry Smith's Avatar
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      • Armenian
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      • Armenia
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      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 2,932
    #2

    Re: I or me

    It's betteer to use "I" in this case. Sometimes we use "me" instead of "I" but mostly in spoken English.
    Good Luck! Harry

  3. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: I or me

    Thanks.

    I thought me might be more correct.
    There is one member in my family:me, sounds better to me than I.

  4. rewboss's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2006
    • Posts: 1,552
    #4

    Re: I or me

    stoney, I think you're actually correct.

    However, the whole "I/me" issue has been a problem for centuries now, and the argument, which still rages, has only served to muddy the waters.

    Take this dialogue:

    "Who's there?"
    "It's only I!"

    A traditionalist would insist that this is the technically correct version, and yet most of us say "It's only me!" It does appear, though, that "me" has more history on its side than "I", and in any case descriptive grammarians would argue that the function of grammar is to describe what sounds natural to an average speaker, not to dictate rules to abide by.

    However, you cite one case here where I think even the most traditionalist of us would not insist on "I" -- certainly in the shortened version you cite.

    Similarly, I don't know any prescriptive grammarian who would insist on this:

    "You're an idiot!"
    "Who, I?"

    The safest strategy, though, is to sidestep the issue completely:

    There are two other members of my family besides me: my father and my mother.

    I am the only member of my family.

    "You're an idiot."
    "Are you talking to me?"

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