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    • Join Date: Aug 2006
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    #1

    Poems on good behaviour

    Can someone tell me where on the Net I can find some poems on good behaviour for elementary students aged between 6 and 13? Thanks in advance.
    Jessica

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    #2

    Re: Poems on good behaviour



    • Join Date: Aug 2006
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    #3

    Re: Poems on good behaviour

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Dear Tdol,
    Thanks for your information. I have done the registration being a member of that site. And I'll look for some appropriate poems for my students. In the meantime, if you find other sites where there are poems about respect for others, being a responsbile person, being a well-behaved child, etc, do let me know. Thanks in advance.
    Jessica

  1. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Poems on good behaviour

    Jessica, Jessica
    Strong and able
    Keep your elbows
    Off the table!

    (Of course, you'd insert the appropriate child's name.)


    We say, "Thank you."
    We say, "Please."
    We don't interrupt or tease.
    We don't argue. We don't fuss.
    We listen when folks talk to us.
    We share our toys and take our turn.
    Good manners aren't too hard to learn.
    It's really easy, when you find.
    Good manners means
    JUST BEING KIND!



    Today I pledge to be kind,
    to use the nicest words I can find.
    Today I pledge to try to share,
    to wait my turn and to be fair.


    (sung to the tune of "Three Blind Mice"):
    3 Nice Mice
    3 Nice Mice
    See how nice they are
    see how nice they are
    They're always polite when they nibble their cheese
    they never forget to say "thank you" and "please"
    they cover their noses whenever they sneeze
    ahhh ahhh ahhh-choo (pretend sneeze)
    3 nice mice 3 nice mice


    (sung to the tune of "I'm a Little Teapot"):
    I have super manners. Yes, I do.
    I can say "Please," and "Thank You," too.
    When I play with friends, I like to share.
    That's the way I show I care!

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Poems on good behaviour

    This one's too long to memorize, but it might be something you can print out and distribute to your older (age 9-13, perhaps) students:



    Pass the Peas Please by Dina Anastasio
    If you run over a sand castle
    Created by your brother
    Kneel down and say, "I'm sorry."
    Then just help him build another

    When you see someone who's different,
    Don't laugh. It isn't fair.
    He might think you are different,
    But he doesn't point and stare.

    If you're angry at a friend,
    Don't punch or kick or shout.
    Go for a walk and count to ten,
    Then try to talk it out.

    No one likes to lose a game,
    But if you must, you must.
    So if you lose, shake hands and say,
    "We'll play again, I trust."

    It's hard to keep a secret,
    But secret telling's wrong.
    Remember, friends who blab too much
    Aren't friends for very long.

    If your father's talking on the phone
    When he should be playing ball,
    Don't kick or sulk or whine, "Let's GO!"
    That will not work at all.

    Don't interrupt your uncle
    When he's talking about his car.
    Even though it's boring -
    Well, you know how uncles are!

    When you're eating mashed potatoes,
    And there's something you must say,
    Please wait until you've swallowed.
    The thought won't go away!

    If your brother has a cupcake
    That's he's saving for tomorrow,
    Don't take a bite, not even one,
    Or he'll be filled with sorrow.

    If your neighbor won't stop talking,
    And you feel a yawn come on,
    Put your mouth behind your fingers,
    Until your yawn is gone.

    Don't eat spaghetti with your knife,
    Your fingers or a spoon.
    Use your fork, although it's hard.
    You'll catch on pretty soon.

    When you're outside playing soccer,
    And kick someone in the knee,
    Don't tell him that he's in your way.
    Say, "Sorry. Pardon me."

    Don't play with Grandma's dishes
    If you father has forbid it.
    but if you do, and if they break,
    Don't say your sister did it!

    We all leave toys and clothes around.
    It's O.K. just once or twice.
    But if a king and queen should come to call,
    They might not think it's nice.

    When someone's in the bathroom,
    And won't get out, don't worry.
    Just knock and say, "I'm waiting.
    I must come in. Please hurry."

    Don't play the drums or sing a song
    When somebody is sick.
    Just tiptoe by and give a wave,
    And say, "Please get well quick."

    When your sister's busy practicing,
    And you really want to hide,
    Don't cover your ears or make a face.
    Just smile and go outside.

    Towels that are soggy
    Will not dry someone's back
    So toss them in the laundry,
    Or hand them on the rack.

    When your sister gets a bicycle
    And you just get a kite,
    Don't say, "You like her better!"
    Say, "Thank you. It's just right."

    If a friend is having trouble,
    And he falls and gives a yelp,
    Don't laugh or point or call him names.
    Say, "Are you hurt?" and "May I help?"

    If there's something very special
    That you'd really like to borrow,
    Ask before you take it,
    And bring it back tomorrow.

    If your great-aunt gives you candy,
    And your friends would like a lot,
    It's nice to share a little,
    Even though you'd rather not.

    When you're going to a movie,
    And the line is two blocks long,
    Don't butt in front, go to the end.
    Then calmly hum a song.

    When you're sitting at the table,
    And want some extra peas,
    Don't shout out, "Gimme more of those!"
    Say, "Pass the peas, please."

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    #6

    Re: Poems on good behaviour

    What about some of Belloc's Cautionary Tales, e.g. "Matilda":

    Matilda told such Dreadful Lies,
    It made one Gasp and Stretch one's Eyes;
    Her Aunt, who, from her Earliest Youth,
    Had kept a Strict Regard for Truth,
    Attempted to Believe Matilda:
    The effort very nearly killed her,
    And would have done so, had not She
    Discovered this Infirmity.
    For once, towards the Close of Day,
    Matilda, growing tired of play
    And finding she was left alone,
    Went tiptoe to the Telephone,
    And summoned the Immediate Aid
    Of London's Noble Fire-Brigade.
    Within an hour the Gallant Band
    Were pouring in on every hand,
    From Putney,Hackney Downs, and Bow
    With Courage high and Hearts a-glow
    They galloped, roaring through the Town,
    `Matilda's House is Burning Down!'
    Inspired by British Cheers and Loud
    Proceeding from the Frenzied Crowd,
    They ran their ladders through a score
    Of windows on the Ball Room Floor;
    And took Peculiar Pains to Souse
    The Pictures up and down the House,
    Until Matilda's Aunt succeeded
    In showing them they were not needed;
    And even then she had to pay
    To get the Men to go away!
    It happened that a few Weeks later
    Her Aunt was off to the Theatre
    To see that Interesting Play
    The Second Mrs Tanqueray.
    She had refused to take her Niece
    To hear this Entertaining Piece:
    A Deprivation Just and Wise
    To Punish her for Telling Lies.
    That Night a Fire did break out -
    You should have heard Matilda Shout!
    You should have heard her Scream and Bawl,
    And throw the window up and call
    To People passing in the Street -
    (The rapidly increasing Heat
    Encouraging her to obtain
    Their confidence) - but all in vain!
    For every time She shouted `Fire!'
    They only answered `Little Liar'!
    And therefore when her Aunt returned,
    Matilda, and the House, were Burned.

    MrP


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 29
    #7

    Re: Poems on good behaviour

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    Jessica, Jessica
    Strong and able
    Keep your elbows
    Off the table!

    (Of course, you'd insert the appropriate child's name.)


    We say, "Thank you."
    We say, "Please."
    We don't interrupt or tease.
    We don't argue. We don't fuss.
    We listen when folks talk to us.
    We share our toys and take our turn.
    Good manners aren't too hard to learn.
    It's really easy, when you find.
    Good manners means
    JUST BEING KIND!



    Today I pledge to be kind,
    to use the nicest words I can find.
    Today I pledge to try to share,
    to wait my turn and to be fair.


    (sung to the tune of "Three Blind Mice"):
    3 Nice Mice
    3 Nice Mice
    See how nice they are
    see how nice they are
    They're always polite when they nibble their cheese
    they never forget to say "thank you" and "please"
    they cover their noses whenever they sneeze
    ahhh ahhh ahhh-choo (pretend sneeze)
    3 nice mice 3 nice mice


    (sung to the tune of "I'm a Little Teapot"):
    I have super manners. Yes, I do.
    I can say "Please," and "Thank You," too.
    When I play with friends, I like to share.
    That's the way I show I care!
    Thank you Ouish for your poems. I will teach these poems to my students. I think they will love them. If you can think of other poems that suit upper elementary level (aged between 10-13), do keep me informed.
    Thanks in advance.
    Jessica


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 29
    #8

    Re: Poems on good behaviour

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    This one's too long to memorize, but it might be something you can print out and distribute to your older (age 9-13, perhaps) students:



    Pass the Peas Please by Dina Anastasio
    If you run over a sand castle
    Created by your brother
    Kneel down and say, "I'm sorry."
    Then just help him build another

    When you see someone who's different,
    Don't laugh. It isn't fair.
    He might think you are different,
    But he doesn't point and stare.

    If you're angry at a friend,
    Don't punch or kick or shout.
    Go for a walk and count to ten,
    Then try to talk it out.

    No one likes to lose a game,
    But if you must, you must.
    So if you lose, shake hands and say,
    "We'll play again, I trust."

    It's hard to keep a secret,
    But secret telling's wrong.
    Remember, friends who blab too much
    Aren't friends for very long.

    If your father's talking on the phone
    When he should be playing ball,
    Don't kick or sulk or whine, "Let's GO!"
    That will not work at all.

    Don't interrupt your uncle
    When he's talking about his car.
    Even though it's boring -
    Well, you know how uncles are!

    When you're eating mashed potatoes,
    And there's something you must say,
    Please wait until you've swallowed.
    The thought won't go away!

    If your brother has a cupcake
    That's he's saving for tomorrow,
    Don't take a bite, not even one,
    Or he'll be filled with sorrow.

    If your neighbor won't stop talking,
    And you feel a yawn come on,
    Put your mouth behind your fingers,
    Until your yawn is gone.

    Don't eat spaghetti with your knife,
    Your fingers or a spoon.
    Use your fork, although it's hard.
    You'll catch on pretty soon.

    When you're outside playing soccer,
    And kick someone in the knee,
    Don't tell him that he's in your way.
    Say, "Sorry. Pardon me."

    Don't play with Grandma's dishes
    If you father has forbid it.
    but if you do, and if they break,
    Don't say your sister did it!

    We all leave toys and clothes around.
    It's O.K. just once or twice.
    But if a king and queen should come to call,
    They might not think it's nice.

    When someone's in the bathroom,
    And won't get out, don't worry.
    Just knock and say, "I'm waiting.
    I must come in. Please hurry."

    Don't play the drums or sing a song
    When somebody is sick.
    Just tiptoe by and give a wave,
    And say, "Please get well quick."

    When your sister's busy practicing,
    And you really want to hide,
    Don't cover your ears or make a face.
    Just smile and go outside.

    Towels that are soggy
    Will not dry someone's back
    So toss them in the laundry,
    Or hand them on the rack.

    When your sister gets a bicycle
    And you just get a kite,
    Don't say, "You like her better!"
    Say, "Thank you. It's just right."

    If a friend is having trouble,
    And he falls and gives a yelp,
    Don't laugh or point or call him names.
    Say, "Are you hurt?" and "May I help?"

    If there's something very special
    That you'd really like to borrow,
    Ask before you take it,
    And bring it back tomorrow.

    If your great-aunt gives you candy,
    And your friends would like a lot,
    It's nice to share a little,
    Even though you'd rather not.

    When you're going to a movie,
    And the line is two blocks long,
    Don't butt in front, go to the end.
    Then calmly hum a song.

    When you're sitting at the table,
    And want some extra peas,
    Don't shout out, "Gimme more of those!"
    Say, "Pass the peas, please."
    Thank you Ouisch for another piece of suggested poem for my older students. It looks long, but I found it describes a wariety of situations in which my students should behave themselves. And also it is a good piece of material teaching rhyming pairs. Thanks for your recommendation.
    Jessica


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 29
    #9

    Re: Poems on good behaviour

    Quote Originally Posted by MrPedantic View Post
    What about some of Belloc's Cautionary Tales, e.g. "Matilda":

    Matilda told such Dreadful Lies,
    It made one Gasp and Stretch one's Eyes;
    Her Aunt, who, from her Earliest Youth,
    Had kept a Strict Regard for Truth,
    Attempted to Believe Matilda:
    The effort very nearly killed her,
    And would have done so, had not She
    Discovered this Infirmity.
    For once, towards the Close of Day,
    Matilda, growing tired of play
    And finding she was left alone,
    Went tiptoe to the Telephone,
    And summoned the Immediate Aid
    Of London's Noble Fire-Brigade.
    Within an hour the Gallant Band
    Were pouring in on every hand,
    From Putney,Hackney Downs, and Bow
    With Courage high and Hearts a-glow
    They galloped, roaring through the Town,
    `Matilda's House is Burning Down!'
    Inspired by British Cheers and Loud
    Proceeding from the Frenzied Crowd,
    They ran their ladders through a score
    Of windows on the Ball Room Floor;
    And took Peculiar Pains to Souse
    The Pictures up and down the House,
    Until Matilda's Aunt succeeded
    In showing them they were not needed;
    And even then she had to pay
    To get the Men to go away!
    It happened that a few Weeks later
    Her Aunt was off to the Theatre
    To see that Interesting Play
    The Second Mrs Tanqueray.
    She had refused to take her Niece
    To hear this Entertaining Piece:
    A Deprivation Just and Wise
    To Punish her for Telling Lies.
    That Night a Fire did break out -
    You should have heard Matilda Shout!
    You should have heard her Scream and Bawl,
    And throw the window up and call
    To People passing in the Street -
    (The rapidly increasing Heat
    Encouraging her to obtain
    Their confidence) - but all in vain!
    For every time She shouted `Fire!'
    They only answered `Little Liar'!
    And therefore when her Aunt returned,
    Matilda, and the House, were Burned.

    MrP
    Thank you Mr. P for your poem. I found that it is difficult for my students as their English level is a bit low. Can you suggest some easier poems?
    Jessica

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    #10

    Re: Poems on good behaviour

    Hello Jessica

    Would the poems need to relate to behaviour? or could they relate to other subjects too?

    MrP

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