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    #1

    Falafel or falafel

    As far as I know we shouldn't captalize food in English, but Should I captalize the name of the food if the it derived from other languages?

    For example,

    Falafel

    Kabsah

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    #2

    Re: Falafel or falafel

    No – just capitalise proper nouns:

    Spanish omelette/French fries/Waldorf salad/Italian dressing.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 16-Oct-2019 at 13:28.

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    #3

    Re: Falafel or falafel

    I would italicise them if they are not so well known.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

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    #4

    Re: Falafel or falafel

    We don't normally do that, Ted.

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    #5

    Re: Falafel or falafel

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    We don't normally do that, Ted.
    I have seen names of exotic food italicized to distinguish them from English words. The well-known names of exotic food like laksa and satay have become accepted as part of the English vocabulary and they are not written in italic. You probably have not heard of other names like nasi lemak, roti canai, rojak and cendol.

    It is also how Lonely Planet books have them written:

    https://www.lonelyplanet.com/malaysi...c78f005/356948

    Legal terms borrowed from Latin are also italicized when referred to in law books, e.g. ultra vires, contra proferentum, lex arbitri.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

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    #6

    Re: Falafel or falafel

    Lonely Planet's editors decided to italicize foreign food terms which they thought their readers would not be familiar with. This is OK when introducing a new term. We never italicize such terms after they've been accepted into English, which typically happens very quickly.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: Falafel or falafel

    Quote Originally Posted by mrmvp View Post
    As far as I know we shouldn't capitalize food in English, but Should I capitalize the name of the food if the it derived from other languages?
    Not unless it happens to be the first word in a sentence. Note the corrected spelling of the word 'capitalize'.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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    #8

    Re: Falafel or falafel

    Capitalise is correct in British English.

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    #9

    Re: Falafel or falafel

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Lonely Planet's editors decided to italicize foreign food terms which they thought their readers would not be familiar with. This is OK when introducing a new term. We never italicize such terms after they've been accepted into English, which typically happens very quickly.
    Only a few of the foreign names of food, the well-known ones, are accepted into English. There are too many names to be included. What about those that are not included?
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

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    #10

    Re: Falafel or falafel

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    Only a few of the foreign names of food, the well-known ones, are accepted into English. There are too many names to be included. What about those that are not included?
    In an article about foreign foods, one common editorial style would be to italicize the first appearance of each name and, thereafter, set it in plain type.
    I am not a teacher.

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