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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    I'd take him with a pinch of salt.

    If I were you, I'd take him with a pinch of salt.

    I've come up with this sentence myself. I understand the meaning of to take something with a pinch of salt, but after browsing, I realize it's not possible to say to take somebody with a pinch of salt. Can I? If not, and supposing it refers to somebody who's not reliable, how can I rephrase the sentence in the title?

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    #2

    Re: I'd take him with a pinch of salt.

    You're correct- you can take a thing with a grain of salt, but not a person. However, you can take whatever that person says (which is a thing) with a grain of salt.

    You could simply say he's not reliable, but if you're looking for an idiom, you might try, 'I wouldn't trust him any farther than I could throw him!'
    Last edited by J&K Tutoring; 07-Nov-2019 at 15:05.

  3. Senior Member
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    #3

    Re: I'd take him with a pinch of salt.

    Is it right/common to say I smell a rat about him? In this case, would it sound natural to say "If I were you, I'd smell a rat about him"? I've googled "smell a rat" but didn't get many hits when it's followed by "about + somebody".

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I'd take him with a pinch of salt.

    "I smell a rat" is not used that way. It is used to mean that you are suspicious about what somebody or some group of people is up to.
    Not a professional teacher

  5. Senior Member
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    #5

    Re: I'd take him with a pinch of salt.

    What about "to have one's reservations about somebody"? Wrong, just like to take somebody with a pinch/grain of salt? If possible, are the following sentences right?

    1- If I were you, I'd have my (or your?) reservations about Jim.
    2- Have your reservations about Jim (Imperative. Sounds strange...)
    3- You'd better have your reservations about Jim.

    The expression I'm looking for also includes the scenario in which I've never talked to somebody, never heard anybody speaking ill of them, but, for some reason, I didn't like their guts (maybe because they remind of somebody else, maybe because I'm envious, jealous....).

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: I'd take him with a pinch of salt.

    Hmmm, he sounds dodgy.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: I'd take him with a pinch of salt.

    Perhaps:

    It's just a gut feeling, but

    I don't think he can be trusted.

    Or something like that.

    (Of course, if it's a woman use she.)
    Not a professional teacher

  8. Senior Member
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    #8

    Re: I'd take him with a pinch of salt.

    But can I say "I have a gut feeling about Jim"?

  9. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: I'd take him with a pinch of salt.

    Not on its own, no. You would have to state what your gut feeling actually is (such as Tarheel's "I don't think he can be trusted"). You could say "I have a bad feeling about Jim".
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 11-Nov-2019 at 20:32.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  10. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: I'd take him with a pinch of salt.

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    If possible, are the following sentences right?

    1- If I were you, I'd have my (or your?) reservations about Jim.
    2- Have your reservations about Jim (Imperative. Sounds strange...)
    3- You'd better have your reservations about Jim.
    It's not normal to advise someone to have reservations.

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