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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    feel very good and convenient living in the city

    Source : my writing practice

    In my city, every restaurant has baby chairs and also kids’ favorite menu.
    This makes me feel very good and convenient living in the city and that`s why I live in my city.

    Does the underlined part make sense or have to be corrected?
    Maybe " I feel it very good and convenient to live in my city ."
    Last edited by keannu; 11-Nov-2019 at 16:32.

  2. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: feel very good and convenient living in the city

    It's not correct, no.

    A person cannot feel convenient. Your rewrite gets around this problem, and is much better, but it's still not correct.

    Because you're attempting to express two different ideas, you should formulate two sentences (or at the very least a complex sentence consisting of two independent clauses). Let me help you with just one of those, in order to show you in a very basic way how to use the word convenient as a predicate.

    Living in City X is convenient.

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: feel very good and convenient living in the city

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    It's not correct, no.

    A person cannot feel convenient. Your rewrite gets around this problem, and is much better, but it's still not correct.

    Because you're attempting to express two different ideas, you should formulate two sentences (or at the very least a complex sentence consisting of two independent clauses). Let me help you with just one of those, in order to show you in a very basic way how to use the word convenient as a predicate.

    Living in City X is convenient.
    What about this correction?

    In my city, every restaurant has baby chairs and also kids’ favorite menu.
    This makes me feel very good and convenient living in the city and that`s why I live in my city.
    => In my city, every restaurant has baby chairs and also kids’ favorite menu.
    Because of this, I feel good and living in my city is convenient.and that`s why I live in my city.

  4. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: feel very good and convenient living in the city

    That's better, but it's still not good.

    I'll write it for you:

    I like living in Seoul because every restaurant has baby chairs and children's menus, which is convenient.

    1) You don't have to say that this makes you feel good. It's obvious enough that you think this is a good thing.
    2) kids' favorite menu is not right. Notice how I corrected it.
    3) Don't say my city. Say the name of the city.

  5. keannu's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: feel very good and convenient living in the city

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    That's better, but it's still not good.

    I'll write it for you:

    I like living in Seoul because every restaurant has baby chairs and children's menus, which is convenient.

    1) You don't have to say that this makes you feel good. It's obvious enough that you think this is a good thing.
    2) kids' favorite menu is not right. Notice how I corrected it.
    3) Don't say my city. Say the name of the city.
    Could you let me know why "kids' favorite menu" is not right? Is it because of "menu" or "kids"?

  6. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: feel very good and convenient living in the city

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Could you let me know why "kids' favorite menu" is not right?
    The grammar is wrong, in three ways:

    1) The grammatical number of menu is wrong. It should be either plural or, if you do mean to use singular, with an article.
    2) The word favorite in this position appears to describe the menu, not the food.
    3) The grammatical number of favorite appears to be wrong. It should be plural, if I understand correctly what you mean.

    Are you talking about special menus, which include dishes that are appealing to children, and which are referred to as kids' favorites? If that is the case, the adjective describes the food (or rather the dishes), not the menus themselves, right?

  7. keannu's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: feel very good and convenient living in the city

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    The grammar is wrong, in three ways:

    1) The grammatical number of menu is wrong. It should be either plural or, if you do mean to use singular, with an article.
    2) The word favorite in this position appears to describe the menu, not the food.
    3) The grammatical number of favorite appears to be wrong. It should be plural, if I understand correctly what you mean.

    Are you talking about special menus, which include dishes that are appealing to children, and which are referred to as kids' favorites? If that is the case, the adjective describes the food (or rather the dishes), not the menus themselves, right?
    I'm sorry I can't understand this correctly.
    The menu means just the names of foods on the menu paper, but at the same time, means the foods of each menu - if said in Korean sense.

  8. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: feel very good and convenient living in the city

    The list of dishes available is a menu, but the paper or cardboard they are printed on is also called a menu.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 12-Nov-2019 at 17:18. Reason: Added missing final punctuation.
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  9. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: feel very good and convenient living in the city

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I'm sorry. I can't understand this correctly.
    Punctuation!
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  10. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: feel very good and convenient living in the city

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I'm sorry I can't understand this correctly.
    The menu means just the names of foods on the menu paper, but at the same time, means the foods of each menu - if said in Korean sense.
    In English, menu has two meanings, as Tarheel points out. It can refer to the selection of food on offer and it can also refer to the piece of paper that you read before ordering.

    If you want the first meaning, you should use a singular noun phrase, with an article. If you want the second meaning, you should use a plural noun phrase.

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