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  1. Senior Member
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    #11

    Re: real-time map updates

    Quote Originally Posted by Yankee View Post
    In my "experience" "sat-nav" is not a commonly used expression in the U.S. for the feature as mentioned by 'keannu'. Rather, GPS would be used.
    And my smart phone GPS/sat-nav is Google's WAZE. Not sure if it's available in the UK.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: real-time map updates

    Yes, I have that app too. I downloaded it about a week ago but I haven't had reason to use it yet.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #13

    Re: real-time map updates

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I use directions via Google Maps on my phone. I refer to that as sat-nav on my phone.

    Point taken about "sat-nav" not being used in AmE. It's commonly used in the UK.
    When I lived in Canada, I used to hear "GPS" for what we call "navigation" in Korea. So I thought that the term "navigation" used in Korea is broken English.
    Now, I first came to know that "sat-nav" in the UK is a counterpart for North American "GPS".
    It has the word "nav" for "navigation", so I guess the Korean term "navigation" might not be totally wrong.

  4. keannu's Avatar
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    #14

    Re: real-time map updates

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    See above.
    If you insert "That's because" or "It's because" to make a subsequent separate sentence, does this make sense? You connected this part to the previous sentence, but the sentences are long, I'd like to separate it.


    My car has a GPS in-built sat-nav, but I usually use my cell phone’s;GPS. GPS. It’s becauseas it is linked to the cellular network, I can use real-time traffic info and real-time map updates.
    => My car has a GPS in-built sat-nav, but I usually use my cell phone’s. That's because it is linked to the cellular network, I can use real-time traffic info and real-time map updates.

  5. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #15

    Re: real-time map updates

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    That's because it is linked to the cellular network, I can use real-time traffic info and real-time map updates.
    No, that's not correct. I now see what you were trying to do by using because as together.

    This is not an easy sentence to construct because you're essentially trying to tie no less than four clauses together into one very complex sentence. I think the best way of doing it is like this:

    Although my car has a built-in GPS, I usually use my cellphone because it is linked to the cellular network, which means I can use real-time traffic info and map updates.

    I've tried to show the complexity by highlighting the two dependent clauses in red. What makes this sentence particularly complex is the fact that both of these clauses are dependent on the same independent clause, marked in blue. The green clause is a relative clause, which is relative to the second of the two dependent clauses. That's quite a grammatical mouthful! I don't think it's too bad, structured like this, but I'd say it's probably a bit too complex.

    I suspect the reason that you wanted to make two separate sentences was due to the over-complexity, and that what you were trying to do with your two sentences was something like this:

    My car has a built-in GPS but I usually use my cellphone. This is because since it is linked to the cellular network, I can use real-time traffic info and map updates.

    The big problem here is that with the way you've constructed the second sentence, you are forced to use two subordinating conjunctions together (highlighted in bold), which is really not good. The first conjunction links the latter of the two independent clauses in the preceding sentence to the final dependent clause of the second sentence! Can you see how confusing that is?

    A way around this problem, still using two separate sentences, is to use a relative clause instead of a second independent clause, like this:

    My car has a built-in GPS but I usually use my cellphone. This is because it is linked to the cellular network, which means I can use real-time traffic info and map updates.

    However, this is still not as good as using a single sentence. Logically speaking, since each clause is related to another, it means that there is only one thought going on, and in my opinion, splitting into two like this interferes too much with the coherence of the thought.

    I hope you understand all that. It just took me half an hour to work it all out.

  6. keannu's Avatar
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    #16

    Re: real-time map updates

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    No, that's not correct. I now see what you were trying to do by using because as together.

    This is not an easy sentence to construct because you're essentially trying to tie no less than four clauses together into one very complex sentence. I think the best way of doing it is like this:

    Although my car has a built-in GPS, I usually use my cellphone because it is linked to the cellular network, which means I can use real-time traffic info and map updates.

    I've tried to show the complexity by highlighting the two dependent clauses in red. What makes this sentence particularly complex is the fact that both of these clauses are dependent on the same independent clause, marked in blue. The green clause is a relative clause, which is relative to the second of the two dependent clauses. That's quite a grammatical mouthful! I don't think it's too bad, structured like this, but I'd say it's probably a bit too complex.

    I suspect the reason that you wanted to make two separate sentences was due to the over-complexity, and that what you were trying to do with your two sentences was something like this:

    My car has a built-in GPS but I usually use my cellphone. This is because since it is linked to the cellular network, I can use real-time traffic info and map updates.

    The big problem here is that with the way you've constructed the second sentence, you are forced to use two subordinating conjunctions together (highlighted in bold), which is really not good. The first conjunction links the latter of the two independent clauses in the preceding sentence to the final dependent clause of the second sentence! Can you see how confusing that is?

    A way around this problem, still using two separate sentences, is to use a relative clause instead of a second independent clause, like this:

    My car has a built-in GPS but I usually use my cellphone. This is because it is linked to the cellular network, which means I can use real-time traffic info and map updates.

    However, this is still not as good as using a single sentence. Logically speaking, since each clause is related to another, it means that there is only one thought going on, and in my opinion, splitting into two like this interferes too much with the coherence of the thought.

    I hope you understand all that. It just took me half an hour to work it all out.
    Thanks for your tremendously big effort. If I had known "since" to replace "as", I wouldn't have asked you. It was kind of tricky.

  7. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #17

    Re: real-time map updates

    Okay, but note that I'm saying you should not use because since together. It's no better than because as.

    You get that, right?

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