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    #1

    Wink a pinch of salt?

    Hello!
    I am not sure what a pich of salt imples in the following sentnece. can anybody help me? Alos, what is the exact meaning of rat race?

    Joggers around the world should perhaps take the research with a pinch of salt and remember that jogging is healthier that the rat race.

  1. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a pinch of salt?

    To take something (or someone) with "a pinch of salt" means to not accept it unquestioningly, or don't automatically believe in it. Be a bit skeptical about it, do some research, and make your own conclusion.

    The "rat race" is the daily chore of going to work and earning money so that you can survive. Working long hours, trying to do better than the person next to you, etc., can lead to stress, high blood pressure and other ills. That's why jogging is much healthier!

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: a pinch of salt?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    To take something (or someone) with "a pinch of salt" means to not accept it unquestioningly, or don't automatically believe in it.
    .
    .
    .
    And the Romans were much more sparing: they used the expression 'cum grano salis'. So you may hear people with a classical education use the variant 'with a grain of salt'.

    b

  3. Philly's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
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    #4

    Re: a pinch of salt?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    And the Romans were much more sparing: they used the expression 'cum grano salis'. So you may hear people with a classical education use the variant 'with a grain of salt'.
    b
    Actually, I'd expect most native speakers to know and use the expression "with a grain of salt" no matter what sort of education. I get the impression that the use of "pinch of salt" may have been an intentional mixing of idioms.
    .
    Just my opinion...

  4. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: a pinch of salt?

    Some of us are so skeptical that a grain of salt isn't nearly enough; we go for that whole pinch.

  5. Philly's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
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    #6

    Re: a pinch of salt?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    Some of us are so skeptical that a grain of salt isn't nearly enough; we go for that whole pinch.
    I go for even more than that sometimes.

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