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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Word stress for certain types of causative verbs

    Hi --

    I think the most stress is on "hair" and "car" --

    I had my HAIR done.
    I got my CAR fixed.


    Usually the last verb would be stressed the most in a sentence.
    I had it CUT
    I had it FIXED


    Why stress hair more than done, car more than fixed?


    Thanks,
    ~r

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Word stress for certain types of causative verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by rompercabeza View Post
    Hi.

    I think the most heaviest stress is on "hair" and "car".

    I had my HAIR done.
    I got my CAR fixed.

    Usually the last verb would be stressed the most in a sentence.

    I had it CUT.
    I had it FIXED.

    Why stress "hair" more than done and "car" more than "fixed"?

    Thanks. Unnecessary. Thank us after we help you, by clicking on the "Thank" button.
    ~r The symbol means nothing and there is no need to sign off a post.
    Welcome to the forum.

    I'm not entirely clear on this at all. I read the first two sentences aloud several times and I didn't really notice any particular stress on any word. I suppose you could say that it's marginally more stressed because it's the relevant bit of information. In the shorter sentences, I definitely didn't stress any particular word. Depending on the meaning, the following can be used:

    I had it cut.
    I had it cut.
    I had it cut.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Word stress for certain types of causative verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by rompercabeza View Post
    I think the most stress is on "hair" and "car" --

    I had my HAIR done.
    I got my CAR fixed.


    Usually the last verb would be stressed the most in a sentence.
    I had it CUT
    I had it FIXED


    Why stress hair more than done, car more than fixed?
    Yes, that's right.

    The stressed word is the 'focus' word. That means that it is the most important word in the sentence, because it presents the listener with new information.

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Word stress for certain types of causative verbs

    Romper, I think Jutfrank's explanation is a good one. However, I also think you should have been able to figure that out for yourself. (Especially if you are, as you claim, an English teacher whose first language is English).
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  5. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: Word stress for certain types of causative verbs

    Thanks, everyone, for your insights, yet the question for me remains unanswered for the following reason: According to Mojsin, (2016), "As a general rule, the last content word of a phrase gets the most stress" (p. 98).

    Hence, there has been no explanation, as far as I can see, of why, in "I had my HAIR done" and "I got my CAR fixed, "hair" and "car." which are content not function words because they are nouns -- and most strikingly they are the final content words in these phrases that should according to Mojsin's general rule get the most stress. But they don't. (p. 98). N.b. I emailed this question to Mojsin's organization and have not yet received a response -- I will shortly telephone, ~Regards, r

    As the initial

    Usually the last verb would be stressed the most in a sentence.

    I had it CUT.
    I had it FIXED.

    Why stress "hair" more than done and "car" more than "fixed"?

    Mojsin, L. (2016). Mastering the American Accent, 2nd ed. Barron's, Hauppauge, NY.

  6. Newbie
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    #6

    Re: Word stress for certain types of causative verbs

    Yes, thank you, that to me is a matter of self-evidence; I am glad we are on the same page of, ... the world, which has many pages, yet is not the 'focus' word here is an another focus word that should take precedence according to Mojsin (2016)?

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    Yes, that's right.

    The stressed word is the 'focus' word. That means that it is the most important word in the sentence, because it presents the listener with new information.

  7. probus's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Word stress for certain types of causative verbs

    Before we give you more answers rompercabeza, kindly correct the information in your profile, particularly your native language. I am leaving your latest post unapproved pending this action on your part. Unapproved posts can be seen only by moderators and admins.

  8. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Word stress for certain types of causative verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by rompercabeza View Post
    Yes, thank you, that to me is a matter of self-evidence; I am glad we are on the same page of, ... the world, which has many pages, yet is not the 'focus' word here is an another focus word that should take precedence according to Mojsin (2016)?
    That's a jumble.
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  9. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #9

    Re: Word stress for certain types of causative verbs

    Which word would you stress in the following:

    I had my hair done at the new salon in Park Road.

  10. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Word stress for certain types of causative verbs

    Agnes: I had my hair done at Betty's Beauty Shop.
    Brenda; I had my hair done at the new salon in Park Road.

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