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Thread: Be at fault

  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    Be at fault

    Hello,

    I am not sure if I understand the bold text below correctly. Does it mean the reporter knew he had failed in carrying out his tasks but he could not say to justify his mistakes the London without the statue is not worth writing about?


    He said nothing at home, and several times both his wife and his daughter told him he was becoming absent-minded in his old age. Once indeed his wife demanded to know what was wrong, and clearly suspected some trouble on the Record that he was hiding from her. And although he assured her there was no trouble, it was a fact that recently several fairly good assignments he had been given had not turned out too well. He had missed what was thought to be a good angle or had turned in copy that read like stale re-hashing. He had had to admit that he was at fault. What he could not say in extenuation was that London without the statues, the real London (though often it seemed completely unreal, a place in a muddled, squalid dream), hardly appeared worth writing about. Now if the statues were really there, what a story he could write!

    J.B.Priestley, The Statues, 1953.


    Thanks.
    Not a Teacher. A guy who is fond of old horror and weird literature and who is interested in English language.

  2. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #2

    Re: Be at fault

    Yes

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