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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Do native speaker sometimes omit relative pronoun in informal writings?

    A1.She waved to the man, who was standing on the corner.
    A2.She waved to the man, standing on the corner.
    ("Standing on the corner" modifies "the man")

    B1.The man getting out of the car, which is parked beside the road, is my friend.
    B2.The man getting out of the car, parked beside the road, is my friend.
    ("parked beside the road" modifies "the car")

    C1.The man standing next to my father, who is beside the dog, is my friend.
    C2.The man standing next to my father, beside the dog, is my friend.
    ("beside the dog" modifies "my father")

    I know very well all the sentences above sound very awakward, but for the purpose of learning the way native speakers use English in informal ways, I purposely constructed them like that.

    So what I want to know is that when context is clear enough that lisnters do already specifically know that in a sitiation, which man, which car, and whose father the speaker or writer refers to, and from this reason, the commas in each sentence must be required, whether native speakers sometimes omit relative pronoun in speaking or in informal writings as in A2, B2, C2?

    In other words, in informal writings or casual speech, do native speakers sometimes omit "relative pronoun" as in A2, B2, C2 when "relative pronoun" is used with commas to NON-RESPECTIVELY modify its preceding noun, not the subject in a sentence?

    I'm not asking about this case when participial phrase modifies non-restrictively the subject in a sentence as in "Mr. Davis, wearing a white jacket, is our coach". Here, "wearing a white jacket" non-restrictively modifies the subject, "Mr. Davis", but I'm asking about the cases as in A2, B2, C2.

    In short, I do really want to know whether in informal writings that do not require strict grammar, native speakers sometimes ungrammatically write as A2, B2, C2, omitting relative pronoun.

    Lastly, would you please make some examples similar to A2, B2, C2?
    Last edited by ardent English learner; 09-Dec-2019 at 02:56.
    I am studying English without a teacher.

  2. VIP Member
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    #2

    Re: Do native speaker sometimes omit relative pronoun in informal writings?

    I think it is perfectly grammatical to omit the relative pronouns in those cases, not just in informal writing.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  3. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Do native speaker sometimes omit relative pronoun in informal writings?

    She waved to the man who was standing on the corner. (No comma.)

    It (the man who was standing on the corner) is a noun phrase.
    Not a professional teacher

  4. VIP Member
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    #4

    Re: Do native speaker sometimes omit relative pronoun in informal writings?

    I think the commas could also be omitted in A2 and B2, but not C2.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  5. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Do native speaker sometimes omit relative pronoun in informal writings?

    Yes. In C1 and C2 you need the commas. (Not that it makes any difference. Nobody would say either one.)
    Not a professional teacher

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