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  1. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: Don't mind him closing the door v.s. Don't mind his closing the door

    Try:

    I don't mind it that he closed the door, but I do mind that he locked the door.
    Not a professional teacher

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: Don't mind him closing the door v.s. Don't mind his closing the door

    Quote Originally Posted by cubezero2 View Post
    Is there a rule clearly defining the difference between the two structures?
    Assuming you mean the structures "someone doing something" and "someone's doing something", years ago I saw a difference in this post: https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/t...=1#post1270113

    Quote Originally Posted by cubezero2 View Post
    And I definitely didn't make things clear, as can be seen in Matthew's reply.
    I did not get your point because I am not a native English speaker.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #13

    Re: Don't mind him closing the door v.s. Don't mind his closing the door

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post


    I did not get your point because I am not a native English speaker.
    Yes, but your posts are very helpful to the learners on this site.
    Not a professional teacher

  4. VIP Member
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    #14

    Re: Don't mind him closing the door v.s. Don't mind his closing the door

    Quote Originally Posted by cubezero2 View Post

    I'd like to hear your opinions.

    Richard

    NOT A TEACHER


    Hello, Richard:

    Here is the "rule" discussed in one of my favorite grammar books.

    1. "I do not approve that man coming with Mary."

    a. Disapproval of the man is indicated.

    2. "I do not approve that man's coming with Mary."

    a. It is the coming of the man that is not approved.


    Source: House and Harman, Descriptive English Grammar (Second Edition), 1950, page 319.

  5. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #15

    Re: Don't mind him closing the door v.s. Don't mind his closing the door

    1. Look at the man wearing a hat. He is so handsome.
    2. Look at the man's wearing a hat. It seems unsuitable here.

    The speaker wants the listener to look at the man in 1 and the hat in 2.
    I am not a teacher.

  6. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #16

    Re: Don't mind him closing the door v.s. Don't mind his closing the door

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    It may work in a different context: "I don't mind his closing the door because it is noisy outside."
    The traditional view that we should use a possessive there is becoming less common, so much so that it sounds odd to many speakers. I would say that it is perfectly correct today, but I would not be surprised to see the usage marked as archaic in the future.

  7. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #17

    Re: Don't mind him closing the door v.s. Don't mind his closing the door

    There is a semantic difference between the two different forms, which is outlined in post #14.

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