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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    R, for “received.”

    https://www.idiomsandslang.com/roger-roger-that/

    Roger; Roger That
    Definition: your message has been received and understood
    Example: “Once you see a CVS drugstore on the right, take the next left.” —”Roger that.”
    Note: From British military abbreviation R, for “received.”

    I can't understand how "R" changed into "Roger", could you explain it to me?

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    #2

    Re: R, for “received.”

    In the phonetic alphabet currently used in American aviation, R is romeo. Apparently at one time the British military used roger.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. probus's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: R, for “received.”

    It is jargon specific to radio communications. As a pilot I can tell you that "roger" is sill used daily in aviation around the world. It is just an acknowledgement that one has received and understood a transmission. Here is a real life example.

    We had taken off from Buffalo, New York and landed at a small airport in Canada. We were sitting on the ground with our engine running waiting to see if a customs agent was going to show up to inspect us.

    Air Traffic Control: Niner Niner Echo, are you just here to clear customs?

    Me: Affirmative, clear customs.

    ATC: Where are you going from here?

    Me: We're still working on that.

    ATC: Okay I'm just going to close your flight plan.

    Me: Roger, thank you.

    "Wilco" on the other hand is an abbreviation for "will comply". It is no longer used, except perhaps in the military.
    Last edited by probus; 11-Jan-2020 at 18:58. Reason: Typo

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: R, for “received.”

    Niner Niner Echo = 990?
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    #5

    Re: R, for “received.”

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    Niner Niner Echo = 990?
    99E. This would be the last three characters of the airplane's tail number (its unique identifier).
    I am not a teacher.

  6. Banned
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    #6

    Re: R, for “received.”

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    https://www.idiomsandslang.com/roger-roger-that/

    Roger; Roger That
    Definition: your message has been received and understood
    Example: “Once you see a CVS drugstore on the right, take the next left.” —”Roger that.”
    Note: From British military abbreviation R, for “received.”

    I can't understand how "R" changed into "Roger", could you explain it to me?

    “Roger” is a U.S. phonetic alphabet. In 1957, the English phonetic alphabet changed the R to “Romeo,”.Roger” means “r,” which stands for “received.” and the word “Roger” means nothing more.

  7. probus's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: R, for “received.”

    Quote Originally Posted by michaelhang View Post
    “Roger” is a U.S. phonetic alphabet. In 1957, the English phonetic alphabet changed the R to “Romeo,”.Roger” means “r,” which stands for “received.” and the word “Roger” means nothing more.
    No. As you say, and as I said before, roger is used in radio communications to acknowledge receipt of a transmission. It is not a "U. S. phonetic alphabet."

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