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  1. Member
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    #1

    Who should I call 'Sir'.

    Usually in my country we call someone 'sir' only if they're senior in position. But in English movies I've seen that everyone calls everyone sir to show respect.

    At the airport I asked for directions to a guy at the check-in counter:

    "Excuse me sir, which way is the Jewel"

    My question is, who can/should I call sir?

  2. VIP Member
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    #2

    Re: Who should I call 'Sir'.

    It depends on where you are. In the US, it is common to address someone, especially a stranger whose name you do not know, as "sir" or "ma'am." It is a matter of being polite.

    In the UK, "sir" has connotations of class, and I understand it is not used commonly among strangers.

  3. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Who should I call 'Sir'.

    No, we certainly do not use Sir to address strangers in the UK. I wouldn't say it has anything to do with class.

    People who are at work (i.e., on duty) use it to address those who are not. For example, a waiter or shop assistant addressing a customer, a police officer or a paramedic addressing a member of the public, etc.

    Also, schoolkids use it to address their teachers.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Who should I call 'Sir'.

    I can honestly say that in my several decades on this planet, I have never addressed anyone as "Sir".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Who should I call 'Sir'.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I can honestly say that in my several decades on this planet, I have never addressed anyone as "Sir".
    Ditto. Unless I was being sarcastic.

    And I don't particularly appreciate being addressed that way, either.

  6. VIP Member
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    #6

    Re: Who should I call 'Sir'.

    And I don't particularly appreciate being addressed that way, either.
    And why is that?

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    #7

    Re: Who should I call 'Sir'.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashraful Haque View Post

    My question is, who can/should I call sir?



    NOT A TEACHER

    Hello,

    Some years back, I was on a bus when a young man boarded. The bus driver addressed him as "sir," and the young man angrily replied, "I'm not old!"

    And one time I consulted a medical doctor for the first time. When I kept replying "Yes, sir" to him, he smiled but was clearly annoyed by asking, "Were you in the army?" Maybe he thought that I was emphasizing his age.

    Store associates (clerks) often "sir" me. (I am 82 years old.) I prefer a "sir" to an insincere "May I help you, young man?"

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