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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    deputy "to" or "of"

    Hello

    Im wondering whether I have to write :

    I have been appointed as Property and Financial affairs Deputy to Mr. X
    or
    I have been appointed as Property and Financial affairs Deputy of Mr. X.

    And under my signature :

    BrommieLuc
    Property and Financial affairs Deputy to Mr. X
    or
    BrommieLuc
    Property and Financial affairs Deputy of Mr. X

    I have a feeling it is to for persons and of for estates/firms in administration.

    Thanks for your clarification.

    Luc
    (not native English speaking)

  2. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: deputy "to" or "of"

    Quote Originally Posted by BrommieLuc View Post
    Hello.
    Hello, and welcome.

    Quote Originally Posted by BrommieLuc View Post
    Im wondering whether I have to write :

    I have been appointed as Property and Financial affairs Deputy to Mr. X
    or
    I have been appointed as Property and Financial affairs Deputy of Mr. X.
    I would write:

    I have been appointed as Mr Garnier's deputy for property and financial affairs.

    Quote Originally Posted by BrommieLuc View Post
    And under my signature :

    Brommie Luc [Note that in English, your name would be: Luc Brommie]
    Property and Financial affairs Deputy Manager [or whatever the full title is] to Mr. X
    Property and Financial Affairs

  3. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: deputy "to" or "of"

    The correct preposition is to.

    I consider of incorrect. You cannot be a deputy of or to an estate or firm. Only to a person.

  4. Moderator
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    #4

    Re: deputy "to" or "of"

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    The correct preposition is to.

    I consider of incorrect. You cannot be a deputy of or to an estate or firm. Only to a person.
    Or the personification of an office. In some American states, sheriff's department officers are deputy sheriffs. Each individual is a sheriff's deputy or simply a deputy.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: deputy "to" or "of"

    Hello.

    - Thank you for the answers. I had a gut feeling it was "to".

    - The "Property and Financial Affairs Deputy" is an administrator to people who cannot administrate their assets themselves (cf. GOV.UK).

    - BrommieLuc is merely my username; I had to make up a username and my Brompton stood beside me.

    Thx

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    #6

    Re: deputy "to" or "of"

    Quote Originally Posted by BrommieLuc View Post
    I had to make up a username and my Brompton stood was standing beside me.
    I am not a teacher.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: deputy "to" or "of"

    Who or what is (a) Brompton? Your car? Your dog?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. Newbie
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    #8

    Re: deputy "to" or "of"

    - A Brompton is a British icon.



    It is THE ultimate folding bike made in the late seventies by engineer Andrew Ritchie MBE in his bedroom overlooking the Brompton Oratory in London.



    In fact using the word “folding bike” is not appropriate because it would downlevel the Brompton to other bikes that fold and that is an insult. A Brompton is another dimension and can only be called Brompton or Brommie (hence Bromptoneer).

    - Why is "stood" not ok ?

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    #9

    Re: deputy "to" or "of"

    Quote Originally Posted by BrommieLuc View Post
    - Why is "stood" not ok ?
    You'd use the past simple in a narrative: His Brommie stood beside him, steadfast, as he resolutely created his UsingEnglish.com username. Your statement was describing a point in time; the Brommie was in the process of standing beside you.

    I'm sorry I can't explain this better. Hopefully a more gifted grammarian will jump in and tell me why the continuous tense was the only natural choice.

    I may have an old Brompton in my garage. When I get home next week, I'll go take a look. I have to say, I found my folding bicycle terribly wobbly and clumsy the few times I rode it. Maybe it's a valuable classic now!
    I am not a teacher.

  10. teechar's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: deputy "to" or "of"

    The continuous is the natural choice because we are describing an ongoing state (stand) with an action (have to make up) occurring in the middle of it. In such contexts, we use a continuous tense for the state and a simple tense for the action.

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