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Thread: Vocal mimicry

  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    Vocal mimicry

    Source : https://en.dict.naver.com/#/entry/ko...b68cb37cb5e93e

    Vocal mimicry
    or Impersonation is
    a metaphorical expression of imitating another's voice or the sounds of birds,animals, etc
    ex1)Doing voices is the comedian's greatest treasure.
    ex2)As soon as this voice imitation hit the airwaves, it became the nationwide popular lingo.


    Are the underlined correct?
    Last edited by keannu; 30-Jan-2020 at 13:04.

  2. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #2

    Re: Vocal mimicry

    Number two would be hits, but it is still not very natural.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Vocal mimicry

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Number two would be hits, but it is still not very natural.
    I assumed it was the past simple "hit" as it's followed by "became".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. keannu's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Vocal mimicry

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Source and/or context?
    ex1 and ex2 are from a dictionary and the first sentence is my own making.

  5. keannu's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Vocal mimicry

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I assumed it was the past simple "hit" as it's followed by "became".
    Yes, as you said, "hit" is the past simple of "hit".
    As soon as this voice imitation hit the airwaves, it became the nationwide popular lingo.

    Actually, I'd like to know the synonyms of "impersonation".
    It seems that in English, they only say "impersonate" to mean when one imitates another's voice and singing.

    1. Are "Doing voices" and "voice imitation" the same as "impersonate"?

    2. In Korean, it's divided into two - imitating another's voice is called "성대모사", while imitating another's singing is "모창".
    I'd like to know how English describes the latter in one or two words.

  6. Skrej's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Vocal mimicry

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Yes, as you said, "hit" is the past simple of "hit".As soon as this voice imitation hit the airwaves, it became the nationwide popular lingo.

    I don't understand what you mean by the words in blue.

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Actually, I'd like to know the synonyms of "impersonation". It seems that in English, they only say "impersonate" to mean when one imitates another's voice and singing.
    It could be either just their speaking voice, or their singing, or both.

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    1. Are "Doing voices" and "voice imitation" the same as "impersonate"?
    Not necessarily. 'Doing voices' could just mean creating character voices, say for a cartoon or animated show,. Here's a clip of Seth McFarlane doing the voices of several characters from the show Family Guy. Earlier in the clip he talks about all the voices he does for the show. Now if I tried to mimic those voices, then I'd be doing an impersonation.

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    2. In Korean, it's divided into two - imitating another's voice is called "성대모사", while imitating another's singing is "모창".
    I'd like to know how English describes the latter in one or two words.
    I think we'd just use 'impersonation' again. English doesn't make a distinction between impersonating a speaking or singing voice.
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