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  1. Member
    Student or Learner
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      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2009
    • Posts: 336
    #1

    When a ship shall have entered a port. v.s. When a ship has entered a port.

    This is a sentence from the York Antwerp Rules 2016, maritime rules for general average.


    When a ship shall have entered a port or place of refuge, or shall have returned to her port of place of loading ... .
    Rule X, Paragraph a, Subparagraph i
    https://comitemaritime.org/wp-conten...correction.pdf
    I'm completely at a loss as to how I should understand 'shall have entered a port'.

    Does this refer to the past, as in 'could have entered a port', or the future, as in 'will have finished school'?

    Is it simply a lawyer's way of saying 'When a ship has entered a port or place of refuge'? Or rather, it carries a meaning that the latter structure can't express.

    I'd like to hear your opinions.

    Richard

  2. J&K Tutoring
    Guest
    #2

    Re: When a ship shall have entered a port. v.s. When a ship has entered a port.

    Is it simply a lawyer's way of saying 'When a ship has entered a port or place of refuge'?

    Yes. The language of law is often confusing.

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