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    #1

    Red face bridge of asses

    what is the meaning of the following idioms: (1) bridge of asses, (2) the lower pleasure, (3) wrong footing someone.

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    #2

    Re: bridge of asses

    I've never met the first 2, although I could guess at a meaning of the 2nd that isn't suitable for family viewing

    To 'wrong foot' someone is to move or make a gesture that makes them put their weight on the wrong foot - as far as their next move is concerned:

    "Ronaldo wrong-footed the defender."

    b


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    #3

    Re: bridge of asses

    Quote Originally Posted by rameshpahwa View Post
    what is the meaning of the following idioms: (1) bridge of asses, (2) the lower pleasure, (3) wrong footing someone.
    For 1), see: http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9126479

    To put the explanation more simply than the article does, the famous Ancient Greek mathematician Euclid published a treatise on geometry. The fifth proof was the last one that most medieval students of classical mathematics would have to learn before they could abandon the study of mathematics. So it was the 'final bridge' that 'asses' (fools) would have to cross in their studies.

    More generally, the term 'bridge of asses' can be applied to anything which marks the boundary of knowledge between beginners and intermediate students.

    2) is from philosophy. The 'higher pleasures' are those of the mind: the appreciation of art, mathematics and natural philosophy. The 'lower pleasures' are the enjoyment of food, drink and sex.

    3) To 'wrong-foot' someone means to surprise them into reacting in the wrong way - they anticipated you would do one thing, but you did another instead. For example, in a game of tennis, the receiver might shift his weight onto his left foot in anticipation of a serve; but the server sends the ball to his right instead - the receiver has been 'wrong-footed'.

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