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  1. Member
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    #11

    Re: The Objective Infinitive Construction

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    I'll leave it to others to comment on that.
    Thanks for your corrections. I see. Obviously,you know English well.
    Last edited by towcats1; 08-Feb-2020 at 22:19.

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: The Objective Infinitive Construction

    Towcats, it is not, in my humble opinion, a definition. What it is is a grammar term I had never heard of before.

    Why do you think it's needed?
    Not a professional teacher

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    #13

    Re: The Objective Infinitive Construction

    towcast1 said,
    In all Russian grammar books.
    Indeed, in Russia we use the terms "The Objective Infinitive Construction" (or "The Complex Object") and "The Subjective Infinitive Construction" (or "The Complex Subject") which can hardly be found in English grammar books.


    The Complex Object comprises a subject + a verb in the active voice + an object + an infinitive/gerund/past participle.

    She wants him to read a book (She wants (what?) him to read a book = the complex object).
    He let me go.
    I saw her crossing a road.



    The Complex Subject comprises a subject + a verb in the passive voice (except for some verbs like "appear", "happen", "turn out" and "be + likely/sure") + an infinitive/past participle/gerund.

    He is likely to win the race (It is likely that he will win the race (a complex sentence) => He is likely to win the race = a simple sentence with the complex subject).
    He seems to be doing nothing.
    She is known to be a good teacher.


    To be honest, I still don't understand how an infinitive or participle can be considered part of a subject.
    Last edited by Alexey86; 09-Feb-2020 at 19:06.

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    #14

    Re: The Objective Infinitive Construction

    We called this the accusative and infinitive construction when I was learning Latin at school, a very long time ago,
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  5. Member
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    #15

    Re: The Objective Infinitive Construction

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    Towcats, it is not, in my humble opinion, a definition. What it is is a grammar term I had never heard of before.

    Why do you think it's needed?
    I desperately needed to hear your humble opinion about it - " it is not a definition. What it is is a grammar term I had never heard of before."

  6. Member
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    #16

    Re: The Objective Infinitive Construction

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    We called this the accusative and infinitive construction when I was learning Latin at school, a very long time ago,
    The accusative and infinitive is a brilliant explanation!

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