Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. Senior Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Sep 2019
    • Posts: 757
    #1

    use pep up in a hyperbolic way

    Hello

    First, is it correct to use "pep me up" about music?

    Listening to this song really peps me up.

    Now, how can I make it hyperbolic? Would this be good?

    Listening to this song really peps up every molecule in me.

    Listening to this song really peps up every fiber inside me / every fiber of my being.


    Is there another expression which means doing something, listening to a song, for instance, makes you euphoric and energetic?

  2. Skrej's Avatar
    Key Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2015
    • Posts: 3,096
    #2

    Re: use pep up in a hyperbolic way

    Quote Originally Posted by alpacinoutd View Post
    First, is it correct to use "pep me up" about music?
    Listening to this song really peps me up. Yes, that's okay and natural.
    Quote Originally Posted by alpacinoutd View Post
    Now, how can I make it hyperbolic? Would this be good?
    Listening to this song really peps up every molecule in me. No
    Listening to this song really peps up every fiber inside me / every fiber of my being.No
    'Pep somebody up' is a set, inseparable phrasal verb. You can change who is being pepped up, but not what.


    Quote Originally Posted by alpacinoutd View Post
    Is there another expression which means doing something, listening to a song, for instance, makes you euphoric and energetic?
    The only one that comes to mind at the moment is 'pump me up', but I'm sure there are others.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  3. Senior Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Sep 2019
    • Posts: 757
    #3

    Re: use pep up in a hyperbolic way

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    'Pep somebody up' is a set, inseparable phrasal verb. You can change who is being pepped up, but not what.




    The only one that comes to mind at the moment is 'pump me up', but I'm sure there are others.


    Is this correct?

    Listening to this song really peps me up.

    And about pump up, are these correct?

    Listening to this song really pumps up every molecule in me.

    Listening to this song really pumps up every fiber inside me / every fiber of my being.



    I think there must be an expression which means that something really makes you energetic and euphoric

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 19,209
    #4

    Re: use pep up in a hyperbolic way

    While your alternative expressions are not commonly used (if at all) I'm sure they would be understood.

    makes you energetic and euphoric

    Well, there's that.

    (Note that I didn't use really.)
    Not a professional teacher

  5. Senior Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Sep 2019
    • Posts: 757
    #5

    Re: use pep up in a hyperbolic way

    But there's gotta be a colorful and interesting idiom about this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    While your alternative expressions are not commonly used (if at all) I'm sure they would be understood.

    makes you energetic and euphoric

    Well, there's that.

    (Note that I didn't use really.)

  6. Tarheel's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 19,209
    #6

    Re: use pep up in a hyperbolic way

    Quote Originally Posted by alpacinoutd View Post
    But there's gotta be a colorful and interesting idiom about this.
    There's jacked, jacked up, and lit up.

    (Note that I put my response after the quoted material.)
    Not a professional teacher

  7. Senior Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Sep 2019
    • Posts: 757
    #7

    Re: use pep up in a hyperbolic way

    Dear all, is this correct?


    My heart leaps to my throat with jubilation whenever I listen to this song.

  8. Tarheel's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 19,209
    #8

    Re: use pep up in a hyperbolic way

    It's OK.
    Not a professional teacher

  9. Moderator
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 16,513
    #9

    Re: use pep up in a hyperbolic way

    But it's not something a native speaker would be likely to say. Keep it simple and say My heart soars whenever I listen to (or hear) this song.
    I am not a teacher.

  10. Senior Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Sep 2019
    • Posts: 757
    #10

    Re: use pep up in a hyperbolic way

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    But it's not something a native speaker would be likely to say. Keep it simple and say My heart soars whenever I listen to (or hear) this song.
    I really like this my friend.

    Is this correct?

    My heart soars when the song soars.
    My heart soars when the violin soars.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •